Eprinex and egg withdrawal

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Cowgirl71, May 15, 2010.

  1. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Songster

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    I'm needing to Eprinex my hens, and am wondering what the egg withdrawal is. It has a 0 day milk/meat withdrawal (it's for cattle). I do sell the eggs, so I'm wanting to be very careful... I'm thinking about five days should be enough. Does this sound okay? Also, can I use it on broody hens? Thanks!
     

  2. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Depends on preparation as to withdrawl times. If you are treating with injectable for worms, be aware the same thing happens in chickens that happens in humans that are treated with this med, the death of so many worms at once can severely stress/kill some chickens. Starting worming with a weaker med is indicated in heavily infested chooks.

    Clinical experience of 50,000 patients who received a dose of 150 ðg/kg in community-based trials undertaken in Africa and Central America demonstrate an incidence of 9% reporting adverse effects. The large majority of these were of the Mazzotti-type (oedema, pruritis and rash), and dizziness, lymphadenitis, transient hypotension, arthralgia, myalgia, headache, and ocular irritation resulting from the sudden death of massive numbers of microfilariae, but in only 0.25% of patients were these rated as severe (WHO, 1990a).

    If treating for ectoparasites (mites, etc.) with the pour-on then five days is pretty conservative (probably more eprinex on outside of shell from external transfer from feathers/skin/beak than any amount in the egg as the med is only somewhat available for transfer through skin) don't know any reason not to use on broody hens.

    Just some info on human dosing and usage to put the relative `risk' in perspective:

    Ivermectin is an antihelmintic used mainly in the treatment of onchocerciasis in humans, and also for strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, trichuriasis and enterobiasis. It is being used in mass treatment of programmes in endemic regions.

    4.2.1 Adults
    Oral: 3 to 12 mg as a single dose per os (about 150 to 200 ðg/kg bodyweight) for onchocerciasis and other parasitic infections.
    4.2.2 Children
    Ivermectin is not given to children weighing less than 15 kg. The dose is 150 ðg/kg bodyweight (in children weighing more).
    Ivermectin is contraindicated in persons with an immediate hypersensitivity to the drug. It should not be given to
    mothers who are breast-feeding until the infant is at least three months old (Reynolds, 1993).

    From: http://www.inchem.org/documents/pims/pharm/ivermect.htm

    Here
    is a list of nearly all other meds that are specific to chooks - handy reference: http://www.cfo.on.ca/_pdfs/PoultryWithdrawalTimeChart-Mar30-07.pdf
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2012
  3. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Songster

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    Thank you! My concern for using it on broodies is because they are not eating near as much as usual, so the ivermectin may take a lot longer to get out of their symptoms, and so the dosage might be a little strong (?). Could it maybe make them uncomfortable enough to leave the nest?
     
  4. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    I read your earlier posting on this: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=320141

    But
    what, specifically, are you needing to treat for? Were they heavily infested (worms/lice/mites) a month ago and it has gotten worse?

    I'd think I'd be more concerned using Sevin dust around broodies than I would Eprinex (for external parasites).

    If you are worming on a schedule, prophylactically, I wouldn't bother with the broodies at all.
     
  5. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Songster

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    My chickens have large roundworms (I think), lice, and one hen that I just bought has scaley leg mites. I really do need to bite the bullet and Eprinex them. I haven't done it yet because I sell all of the eggs (30 dozen/week), and so throwing away a weeks worth of eggs is really hard to do. And other than the "SLM" hen, they all look happy and healthy.

    Question for you: I currently have two flocks, side by side. Could I Eprinex one flock, and then a week later Eprinex the other? My concern with this is I'll inevitably track some of the "Eprinex faeces" into the other pen. Would this then "vaccinate" all of the worms, etc. in the other pen, or would it be fine?
     
  6. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    It is a zero withdrawl time med in meat and milk. And, unless you are injecting your eggs with the stuff, I'd buy them the day after you treated them. Maybe treat the hen that you suspect has the worst worm load first, and wait 24hr. As I've said, and if you search threads on worming you'll note that, as in humans, the death of a very large number of worms in a short period of time can stress/kill the host. This is one of the reasons a milder wormer is recommended (most have withdrawl times, however) as the initial treatment in suspected heavy infestations.

    If I had as many eggs going out a wk., as you, I'd take a fecal specimen to a vet to get a positive ID the offender(s). Do you have help to clean out the coops and remove/change litter/clean runs after treatment (sounds like you're being swamped in one of the lower circles of parasite hades)? Remember to wear gloves when in contact with the stuff (some will get through skin).

    Sure wish you the best, maybe someone else who operates on a larger scale could chime in on their experience.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2010

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