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Ex-battery hen help... please

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by laurapeers, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. laurapeers

    laurapeers Out Of The Brooder

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    hi chicken friends.

    5 days ago I rescued 3 battery hens from slaughter and I have been an emotional mess watching them go from terrified birds to happy hens scratching and dust bathing!!

    I have 1 hen, Freeda who has a lump under her eye on one side.. it seems to be getting larger as the days go by. Freeda is also sneezing but has no snot or runny eyes etc.. she is otherwise loving her new freedom.

    any ideas what it could be?? [​IMG]
     
  2. laurapeers

    laurapeers Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]
     
  3. laurapeers

    laurapeers Out Of The Brooder

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    anyone??? xxxx
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Since she is sneezing, she may have a sinus infection. Two common ones are mycoplasma (MG,) and coryza. Does the swelling feel soft or hard? MG can also cause foamy eyes, and nasal drainage. Coryza usually causes a foul smelling nasal secretions, coughing , and rattly breathing. Tumors have also been know to appear on the face. If you have a local vet, they might help in testing for those. Antibiotics may help symptoms, and Tylan 50 injectable is the only one available in feed stores. Here is some information about MG and coryza:
    Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Synonyms: MG, chronic respiratory disease (CRD), infectious sinusitis, mycoplasmosis
    Species affected: chickens, turkeys, pigeons, ducks, peafowl, and passerine birds.
    Clinical signs: Clinical symptoms vary slightly between species. Infected adult chickens may show no outward signs if infection is uncomplicated. However, sticky, serous exudate from nostrils, foamy exudate in eyes, and swollen sinuses can occur, especially in broilers. The air sacs may become infected. Infected birds can develop respiratory rales and sneeze. Affected birds are often stunted and unthrifty (see Table 1).
    There are two forms of this disease in the turkey. With the "upper form" the birds have watery eyes and nostrils, the infraorbitals (just below the eye) become swollen, and the exudate becomes caseous and firm. The birds have respiratory rales and show unthriftiness.
    With the "lower form", infected turkeys develop airsacculitis. As with chickens, birds can show no outward signs if the infection is uncomplicated. Thus, the condition may go unnoticed until the birds are slaughtered and the typical legions are seen. Birds with airsacculitis are condemned.
    MG in chicken embryos can cause dwarfing, airsacculitis, and death.
    Transmission: MG can be spread to offspring through the egg. Most commercial breeding flocks, however, are MG-free. Introduction of infected replacement birds can introduce the disease to MG-negative flocks. MG can also be spread by using MG-contaminated equipment.
    Treatment: Outbreaks of MG can be controlled with the use of antibiotics. Erythromycin, tylosin, spectinomycin, and lincomycin all exhibit anti-mycoplasma activity and have given good results. Administration of most of these antibiotics can be by feed, water or injection. These are effective in reducing clinical disease. However, birds remain carriers for life.

    Infectious Coryza

    Synonyms: roup, cold, coryza
    Species affected: chickens, pheasants, and guinea fowl. Common in game chicken flocks.
    Clinical signs: Swelling around the face, foul smelling, thick, sticky discharge from the nostrils and eyes, labored breathing, and rales (rattles—an abnormal breathing sound) are common clinical signs. The eyelids are irritated and may stick together. The birds may have diarrhea and growing birds may become stunted (see Table 1).
    Mortality from coryza is usually low, but infections can decrease egg production and increase the incidence and/or severity of other diseases. Mortality can be as high as 50 percent, but is usually no more than 20 percent. The clinical disease can last from a few days to 2–3 months, depending on the virulence of the pathogen and the existence of other infections such as mycoplasmosis.
    Transmission: Coryza is primarily transmitted by direct bird-to-bird contact. This can be from infected birds brought into the flock as well as from birds which recover from the disease which remain carriers of the organism and may shed intermittently throughout their lives. Birds risk exposure at poultry shows, bird swaps, and live-bird sales. Inapparent infected adult birds added into a flock are a common source for outbreaks. Within a flock, inhalation of airborne respiratory droplets, and contamination of feed and/or water are common modes of spread.
    Treatment: Water soluble antibiotics or antibacterials can be used. Sulfadimethoxine (Albon[​IMG], Di-Methox[​IMG]) is the preferred treatment. If it is not available, or not effective, sulfamethazine (Sulfa-Max[​IMG], SulfaSure[​IMG]), erythromycin (gallimycin[​IMG]), or tetracycline (Aureomycin[​IMG]) can be used as alternative treatments. Sulfa drugs are not FDA approved for pullets older than 14 weeks of age or for commercial layer hens. While antibiotics can be effective in reducing clinical disease, they do not eliminate carrier birds.
     
  5. MasAhora

    MasAhora Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am of no help (sorry) but maybe some more information might be useful to wiser BYC members.

    Is the lump hard or soft? Is she scratching at it? No other lumps evident when you pick her up and check her body?

    Is she sneezing a lot? Constantly? Just at feed time? Just started sneezing or since you got her?

    I hope she is going to enjoy her lovely new life with you!!!

    ETA: oooops a wiser BYC member posted just before I did....good luck!
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    MasAhora has good questions. She is probably starting a molt, since she was culled by the egg factory, and that is a prime time to bedome ill due to the normal stress, along with being rehomed. Hens who are ill or molting do not eat or drink well, so if you can give her plenty of fluids and tempt her with some chopped egg, feed mixed with lots of water to make it soupy, and a tsp of plain yogurt daily.
     
  7. laurapeers

    laurapeers Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks so much for both your posts, it means a lot!!

    Freeda is eating, drinking, dust bathing, scratching and generally loving her new free range retirement.

    the lump on her face is still there and it is hard to the touch. she doesn't seem to like me poking it so maybe it's sore? there is no discharge from eyes or nose and I have been keeping a close eye on it.... she is still sneezing, prob once every few minutes. is it at eating time? well yes.. because all 3 of my rescue girls have literally not stopped eating since I got them.. it's as though they were on rations before. poor babies!

    I'd like to add that after 7 years of chicken keeping, these 3 ex battery hens have brought me the most joy of all! I LIVE them with all my heart.

    any further advice on Freeda would be great! xx

    xxxx
     
  8. MasAhora

    MasAhora Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Perhaps she does not have perfect health, but she is loving her new life, however long that maybe, and the fact that you radiate such affection and pleasure towards her is the best medicine available to both her and you. [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. laurapeers

    laurapeers Out Of The Brooder

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    ar thank you so much! my 3 new girls have brought me such joy and I cannot get enough of their company. they are clearly so happy in their new home. I prey that they no longer remember their previous lives and they are living for today!
     

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