final details roosts

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by davidr, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. davidr

    davidr Songster

    151
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    Jan 22, 2009
    Mokena, IL
    I am using 2x4's for roosts 4" side up/down how ever you want to look at it.

    - route the edges with a round over bit. ??
    - paint the roosts or leave them bare wood. ??
    - any type of wood better than another, pine, cedar, oak, etc.
    - 36" off the floor ? higher / lower?

    Trying to complete for move in this Saturday.

    Thanx,

    David

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  2. mrbstephens

    mrbstephens Songster

    I just put in my roost yesterday for my 6 chicks. It's a 6 foot long 2x4 with the 4" side up. I sanded it with a palm sander. Don't use cedar because this is known to cause respitory illness. You can route the edges if you really want to, but I just sanded them to get the rough edge out. Sanding makes the roost easier to clean. Don't paint it, because it'll chip off from the chickens claws. If you really want to you can finish it with an oil of some kind that is non-toxic, but it's not necessary. Make the roost at least 12 inches away from the back wall too and not too close to drafts that can't be covered in the winter. I have mine in front of the windows that can be covered up with plexi glass. They like to be able to look outside. Hope this helps. [​IMG]
     
  3. CityChook

    CityChook Songster

    1,719
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    Apr 9, 2008
    Minneapolis, MN
    My Coop
    I also sanded the corners of mine, just to make them more comfortable. I don't think this is necessary, but it's nice.

    I just used pine boards, 2x4.

    Height will depend on your flock. If you have big booty girls, then make it a bit lower to avoid any foot/leg problems when they jump down. Deep litter also helps with this. I've heard of chickens roosting in the rafters, so I'm sure it's a breed thing. The roost for my BOs is at 30 inches.

    I coat my roost once a year with linseed oil/mineral spirits (50/50 mix). It moisturizes the wood, fills it and provides a somewhat waterproof barrier. It won't chip off with their toenails because it's absorbed into the wood. When the roost gets a little poo-ey, I just sprinkle it with a little DE and the give it a scrape. No big deal.

    One thing to consider is making your roost removable or liftable. It will make your spring/fall clean-out much easier. My roost simply goes from one wall to the other and we made a "cradle" to hold it to the walls. It lifts out and can be cleaned in the yard.

    Good luck!
     

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