Flock picking on one chicken

Jajika

Songster
12 Years
Dec 24, 2007
560
82
197
Northern California
Hi Everyone:

I can use some advice. One of my chickens, Funky, is getting picked on. Noticed some blood on her back.

I have eight hens.

When I had seven, I rescued a battery chicken that had been part of a large group of rescues from a local factory farm. For whatever reason, they took all but one! When I went to adopt a couple,. this one was the only chicken left!!! Makes no sense why they would leave one, but I adopted her because I couldn't just leave her there.

Don't like to bringing one new girl into the group, but there were no other hens at the Humane Society to come home with her.

It's been six months and things were going well. Now I'm noticing a lot more activity in terms of pecking at Funky.

I can't isolate her easily...and that to me is not a permanent solution.

Wondering if I adopt two more pullets to distract the group and at least the new ones will have each other.

Advice?

Thanks much.
 

ChickensAreSweet

Heavenly Grains for Hens
9 Years
Jun 8, 2010
15,100
621
398
Pacific NW- where the Douglas Firs grow
Some people say pinless peepers work (chicken blinders), and some say they don't.

You may consider trying them- I have never used them.

Another alternative if there is only one bully is to separate the bully in a dog crate for a week or two. This will lower her in the pecking order, but maybe only temporarily.
 

ChickenPox

Songster
8 Years
Feb 2, 2011
763
35
148
Middle GA
My friend says she's had luck with the anti-pick goo they sell at TSC. Every single one of my guys pick. :( Some birds are bigger targets than others. Some have bare spots and broken pin feathers (little bit of bleeding) and some are missing no feathers at all. I honestly don't feel like putting pinless peepers on 25 birds. I'm going to try the goo stuff myself on the handful of birds that get picked at the most. Hoping it helps.
 

ChickensAreSweet

Heavenly Grains for Hens
9 Years
Jun 8, 2010
15,100
621
398
Pacific NW- where the Douglas Firs grow
My friend says she's had luck with the anti-pick goo they sell at TSC. Every single one of my guys pick.
Some birds are bigger targets than others. Some have bare spots and broken pin feathers (little bit of bleeding) and some are missing no feathers at all. I honestly don't feel like putting pinless peepers on 25 birds. I'm going to try the goo stuff myself on the handful of birds that get picked at the most. Hoping it helps.
You can try switching them to unmedicated chick starter with oyster shell on the side for a little while or Flock Raiser with oyster shell on the side, both 20% protein.

It might help them. Also you may want to put out a little salt like kelp meal in a dish free choice, or Redmond Mineral Conditioner free choice (has salt in it).

Not enough salt, not enough protein can cause it. However, some breeds are predisposed to it, I have read, like Leghorns. It is a habit, but you may want to try the higher protein feed for just a bit to see if it makes a difference. Just my opinion!
 

ChickenPox

Songster
8 Years
Feb 2, 2011
763
35
148
Middle GA
Thanks! I will try it!! I"m pretty sure my month older set learned it because they were in the brooder a little longer than I wanted while the coop/run was finished. The month younger set wasn't doing it at all until they became intergrated with these guys. I weeded out some of the worst offenders (Marans roos and a nasty Wyandotte hen) and it reduced some. Some don't do it that I've noticed. Like the Cochins. Everyone's feathers seem to be growing back as well, although I had a SFH get stuck in the feeder one night and her butt was RAW the next morning. :( She was ok, but now they target her and break off her pin feathers. Silly question, but can that scar and cause the feathers to not grow back at all?

And sorry, OP, not trying to thread Hyjack!
 

Jajika

Songster
12 Years
Dec 24, 2007
560
82
197
Northern California
Thanks for all the great advice.

Fortunately the abuse seems to have stopped! I've been checking on her as much as time will allow.

No more blood spots on her back.

They do shoo her away often, but she's spunky and manages to take care of herself. She eats and drinks just fine. She also seems to know who is her friend and who she can hang with.

Will continue to monitor the situation.
 

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