Flock Size

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by charliewhite, Aug 21, 2013.

  1. charliewhite

    charliewhite New Egg

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    Aug 16, 2013
    A lot of people who own chickens have a dozen plus laying hens. From my research a good laying hen does about 200 a year. 200 X 12 is 1200. 1200/52 means around 24 eggs a week! That's a TON of eggs... and a lot of people have more than 12 laying hens... How many hens do you guys have? And if some one has more than 12 laying hens, what do you do with all those eggs?

    Charlie
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  2. ToManyBuffs

    ToManyBuffs New Egg

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    Jun 24, 2013
    Why did u multiply a years worth of eggs by 12? Just divide the 200 by 52 and the answer is a better 3-5 eggs per week per hen. However most production breeds lay 5-7 per week and they add up quickly. Craigslist neighbors family etc. Noone u know should ever have store bought eggs again :)
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Jun 18, 2010
    Southern Oregon
    I have probably 20-24 hens, not exactly sure.

    We eat a lot of eggs. Eggs for breakfast every morning. Breakfast for dinner sometimes. Baking, etc

    My dogs and cats get eggs also. Glossy coats!

    Once a month my church does Men's Breakfast. Those guys eat a lot of eggs! I donate usually 3-4 dozen.

    I gift eggs to a few friends who like to bake and appreciate the fresh eggs. These ladies are struggling money wise, thus the gifting.

    I sell some to co-workers. I'm off work currently and have a co-worker offering to drive 28 miles one way to buy eggs, she misses my fresh eggs so much.

    Of course, not all my hens are at peak production. Some are molting, some are older and don't lay as often, some are raising babies and haven't started laying again yet.

    I also like to gift a dozen to my kid's friends. I find even teenage boys think it's cool to go gather eggs, I then let them take them home. I think anything I can do to encourage an interest in where food comes from or livestock is a good thing!
     

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