Found Bator

jc12551

Songster
12 Years
Jan 8, 2008
666
28
173
S.W. TN
Woo Hoo I opened a cabinet in my new classroom (teacher retired--so I upgraded) and found.......a never been used, unopened HovaBator still air and in another box an automatic egg turner!!!! The boxes were degraded, but the flap was still taped and the bator wrapped in plastic.

I was on cloud nine--it was like Christmas. My students and I built one from a cooler, but no eggs hatched. So now we have one. I plugged it in and let the temperature stabilize today. On Monday I am loading it up.
 

enola

Crowing
11 Years
Jan 23, 2009
13,143
1,472
378
Irwin, Pennsylvania (Pittsburg area)
What kind of fuzzy butts are you going to hatch ?

Inquiring minds just want to know !!

thumbsup.gif
 

jc12551

Songster
12 Years
Jan 8, 2008
666
28
173
S.W. TN
I have an EE rooster, two EE hens and two Australorp hens. So they will be basically EE. After we get things rolling and ironed out good I will start looking to buy eggs.
 

Mahonri

Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
May 14, 2008
30,366
313
546
North Phoenix
My Coop
My Coop
It depends upon the color of the egg the roo came from.

If he came from a real greenish blue egg and breeds an australorp, the pullets produced could give you green, olive or even brown eggs.
 

TimG

Songster
11 Years
Jul 23, 2008
1,353
26
194
Maine
Quote:
The color gene is dominant, let's call it C. So a colored egg layer can be CC, cC or Cc. A roster (or hen) hatched from a green egg can be CC, cC, Cc or cc.

So, the short answer is: not always. It would be a good math/genetics exercise to hatch out a bunch of eggs from known parents and from the ratio of colored egg layers to non-colored egg layers that are produced, figure out what geneotype the parents were.
 

steve2495

Songster
10 Years
May 17, 2009
530
2
131
Lake Forest Illinois
Quote:
The color gene is dominant, let's call it C. So a colored egg layer can be CC, cC or Cc. A roster (or hen) hatched from a green egg can be CC, cC, Cc or cc.

So, the short answer is: not always. It would be a good math/genetics exercise to hatch out a bunch of eggs from known parents and from the ratio of colored egg layers to non-colored egg layers that are produced, figure out what geneotype the parents were.

so if the the roo or hen i have has CC then all of the offspring even if it is bred with a cc( any breed that doesnt lay green eggs) wil still lay green eggs, however if i had a Cc or a cC bred to a cc the 3/4 would lay green eggs and the rest wouldnt. Right?
 

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