Fowl Pox: does the soil become contagious?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Judy, Feb 3, 2015.

  1. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

    34,028
    452
    448
    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    This is a copy of a PM exchange which recently occurred between several members, and which they agreed to share on the forum.

    How long is Pox contagious in the soil ?
    [​IMG]
    nikki_r5

    Jan 31, 2015 at 5:05 pm
    How long is Pox contagious in the soil ?


    BYC states that the cause is a virus from Mosquitoes.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/fowl-pox-cocci-mareks-info


    BYC states that the cause is a virus from Mosquitoes.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/poultry-diseases-1

    The merckmanuals says that the pox is a virus.
    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/poultry/fowlpox/fowlpox_in_chickens_and_turkeys.html


    Avian Pox in Garden Birds
    http://www.bto.org/sites/default/fi...vian-pox-garden-wildlife-health-factsheet.pdf

    But, How long is Pox contagious in the soil and what do you do for it ?

    Please help so that I may pass this info. on.
    My Bobbie had the cankers then she'd scratch. This caused horrific draining in her mouth and onto the ground.






    [​IMG]
    speckledhen

    Jan 31, 2015 at 5:12 pm
    I have no idea. Fowl pox is a virus passed by mosquitoes, but after they have it, they are immune to it. Did she have canker or wet pox? Those are two different diseases. Canker is a fungal disease that leaves carriers, pox is a virus that passes through a flock and then it's over.
    C

    [​IMG]
    nikki_r5

    Jan 31, 2015 at 5:31 pm
    I just meant the sores she had the Dry Pox.
    She ended up with the wet afterwards ! She did not have any yellow / whitish to start with.
    She WAS alive here: active, eating, cleaning, ect. But, she died.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    casportpony

    Jan 31, 2015 at 5:31 pm
    I don't know either. Had pox here in 2013 and about 5% of the chicken flock got it. Some had dry pox, some had wet pox and a few had both.

    -Kathy

    [​IMG]
    nikki_r5

    Jan 31, 2015 at 5:43 pm
    I'm just concerned about putting any other birds in her pen ?
    I remember (?)someone on BYC(?) said: Just to keep them isolated & watch if the scabs that falls that they could/would still be contagious ?

    [​IMG]
    Judy

    Jan 31, 2015 at 6:23 pm
    I never had any wet pox here, just one round of dry that affected almost all the birds for 3 weeks, then suddenly stopped. This was several years ago and I have added new birds since then, but have never seen an outbreak since.

    Not much help from me, sorry.

    Someone should consider making a thread of this. It would be fien with me to copy my comments onto the forum.
    [​IMG]
    dawg53

    Jan 31, 2015 at 7:33 pm
    Fowl pox does not make the soil contageous. If that were true, every new bird brought into a "clean" flock would get the virus. The yellow scabs that you see on combs and wattles caused by dry pox are highly infective and eventually fall onto the soil. The scab stays infective but not the soil. If another chicken comes along and eats the scab, it will get wet pox. Wet pox can occur via a cut in skin as well. Mosquitos are the main carriers of the virus as previously mentioned. Once the virus has passed through the flock, the flock will be immune to that particular strain although there are other strains that can still infect the same flock.
    Birds that have wet pox die of starvation due to lesions causing blockage in the mouth or esophagus, they cant swallow feed. Wet pox can also infect the trachea and lungs. Lesions in the mouth can be removed using tweezers and swabbing with iodine. There'll be alot of blood, sometimes it's best to cull birds with wet pox, cant use tweezers in the esophagus.
    It's best to use iodine or black shoe polish on the infective scabs on the comb and wattles, either will help shrink the scabs and prevent them from falling onto the ground. Of course always avoid the eyes and nostrils when using iodine or black shoe polish. Eggs are safe to eat when birds have fowl pox.

    Canker is a protozoa and requires treatment with flagyl or metronidazole. Metronidazole 250mg can be purchased online as "Fishzole." Dosage is one 250mg tablet given orally to each infected bird once a day for 5 days. Birds with canker are carriers for life and will spread it mainly via waterers/feeders. Canker has a foul odor, lesions look necrotic. Acidified copper sulfate will keep it in check with monthly treatments in water containers (plastic, not metal.) Dosage is 1/4 teaspoon per gallon of water for 3 days straight. It must be given every month to prevent the canker from spreading. Wild birds or carrier chicken can introduce canker into a flock.


    [​IMG]
    Judy

    Jan 31, 2015 at 8:56 pm
    Guess that I should add that I did treat my case of dry pox with Betadine (Neosporin for the few who had lesions very close to their eyes.) They all got one treatment only.

    Thanks, Jim, that was very informative. I'd still like to see this on the forum. Would everyone agree to have their PM's posted? I'd be glad to make the thread.

    Judy
    BYC Staff
    [​IMG]
    speckledhen

    Jan 31, 2015 at 9:35 pm
    I'm fine with my PM being put on the forum with this discussion. I never even thought about the soil being infective with pox, only the scabs, just never heard the question even asked before now. Mine have never had it, but dry pox isn't usually a huge deal, I've been told, since it runs through and then they're immune to it, not carriers. I know that Pine Grove, an authority on almost anything chicken, vaccinates his flocks for it because he lives in extreme south Georgia, big-time mosquito country.

    [​IMG]
    casportpony

    Jan 31, 2015 at 9:52 pm
    So maybe the question should have been about how best to clean an area where a chicken or turkey covered in pox scabs has been and how long one should worry about the ground have bits of scabs on it. I'm fine with info here being posted in a thread.

    Regarding wet pox, I have to agree with Jim about culling them. Although I managed to save well over 90% of mine that had wet pox, it was a lot of work and I'm not sure I'd want to do that again.

    If any of you want to see some pictures of my severe cases, check out this link:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/g/...s-of-pus-and-scabs/sort/display_order/page/0/

    -Kathy

    [​IMG]
    dawg53

    Jan 31, 2015 at 9:56 pm
    I dont mind having it put in the forum. I've dealt with dry pox when I lived in Camden. Fowl pox is a rite of passage living in South Georgia LOL!

    [​IMG]
    casportpony

    Jan 31, 2015 at 10:07 pm
    I jinxed myself in 2013... about two weeks before I saw my first one with pox I said to myself "at least I haven't had to deal with pox". [​IMG]

    -Kathy

    [​IMG]
    speckledhen

    Feb 1, 2015 at 9:59 am
    Yeah, you wait long enough, you'll see a lot more than you thought you would, some stuff you never even heard of, Kathy, LOL. I've had the bizarre stuff, not the normal stuff happen here. I think living up here at my elevation helps keep the mosquitoes down somewhat.
    Cynthia

    [​IMG]
    dawg53

    Feb 1, 2015 at 4:49 pm
    Cyn. I think I remember you having to deal with a fungal problem at one point. I dont remember what you used to treat it, oxine?

    [​IMG]
    speckledhen

    Feb 1, 2015 at 4:52 pm
    Yes, Oxine solution in a cool mist vaporizer, in 10 minute misting sessions. Them breathing in that mist knocked it right out. Can't recall how much I put in, maybe a couple of tablespoons in the entire unit filled with water, would have to check my thread on it.
    C

    [​IMG]
    dawg53

    Feb 1, 2015 at 5:11 pm
    Right. I used it on a two hens for what I thought was MG, turned out it was fungal. I used a regular plastic bottle pump mister from K-Mart garden center. I misted over their heads 3 times a day for 10 days. It cleared up in 5 days, but did 10 days. I mixed it at 1/8 teaspoon per gallon of water and filled the spray bottle in that manner.

    [​IMG]
    speckledhen

    Feb 1, 2015 at 5:25 pm
    Yup misting it that way works, too. Oxine kills fungi, bacteria and viruses and you can put it in their waterers so it's safe. Breathing it when fungal crud sets up housekeeping in the lungs would make perfect sense. And it fixed it for every bird who had it that summer. Hasn't made a repeat appearance, either, but that was a really weird summer.

    [​IMG]
    Michael Apple

    Feb 1, 2015 at 7:40 pm
    I have used Oxine for many years now as a disinfectant. I use 3.25 oz per gallon of water or .75 oz a quart. I use citric acid as the activator: 2 tsp (10 grams) in 3.35 oz of Oxine, let sit for 5 minutes, then mix it in water. For .75 oz of Oxine, I use .5 tsp citric acid.

    [​IMG]
    speckledhen

    Feb 1, 2015 at 8:30 pm
    I have the Virkon tablets that each make a pint of solution as well as the Oxine so I'm all set for cleaning up around here.

    [​IMG]
    nikki_r5

    Yesterday at 10:28 pm
    Yes, Please if somebody would post this !
    I spent time searching you out to glean what info. I could without having to wait & hope !
    You might say I try to go "Straight to the Horse's Mouth !"
    Thank You Thank You
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    56,778
    11,620
    751
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by