Fowl pox treatment

Jdelage87

Hatching
Nov 4, 2018
2
1
4
hey y’all my 3 hens def have fowl pox... how to treat? They all have the physical blisters on their combs ... no feet yet. Called vet want to charge me ridiculously. Also started molting a bit.... they are a lil over a year old ... please help?

-new hen mommy
 

Hobbits Mommie

Songster
Sep 21, 2018
393
850
192
Lakeland, FL
There are two types of fowl pox. Dry (the blisters you're seeing externally) and Wet which are internal lesions affecting the mouth, trachea, etc. They can have one, or both types simultaneously. Dry Pox is survivable, Wet Pox is not. Neither is curable, both are preventable with vaccine, but Dry Pox can be treated with antibiotics in the water to prevent secondary infections which is what they usually succumb to. I tried to treat the blisters themselves with iodine, but I think this only caused the disease to spread. There is also antibiotic ointment you can get at your local feed store for the eyes. The most important thing you can do is quarantine the birds from the rest of the flock, and dispose of any "hot debris" (bedding, etc.) into a plastic bag and dispose with the trash. Don't cross contaminate and wear latex gloves when handling the birds or any of their feed, bedding, etc.

This is a very long drawn out process, and you should be prepared to euthanize if necessary.
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,503
10,888
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North Florida
Dry pox usually runs it's course in several weeks with no real issues unless a bird is in a weakened condition. Birds usually survive dry pox. Wet pox is much more serious, and is also less common. It's best to leave the blisters/lesions alone, messing with them can spread the virus. Keeping things clean, especially feeders and waterers can help prevent the spread. Monitor them to make sure they are eating and drinking normally. If you are in an area where mosquitos are prevalent then putting window screen over all your coop openings can help prevent them from being bitten at night while roosting, which can decrease your incidence. I put screen over the door also, cut in strips that hang down loose, so the birds can still go in and out, but not the mosquitos. There are lots of articles on pox, here is one:
https://the-chicken-chick.com/fowl-pox-prevention-treatmen/
 

Hobbits Mommie

Songster
Sep 21, 2018
393
850
192
Lakeland, FL
How to tell if it’s wet pox?
he Wet Form: Chickens affected with the wet form of Fowl Pox will also develop lesions. These lesions will typically affect the inside of an infected bird’s mouth, throat and trachea or on the conjunctiva of a bird’s eye. A chicken’s trachea may appear reddened and inflamed. The wet form is the more serious form of the two due to the fact that as the lesions grow and develop they may block air coming into the trachea causing suffocation. Also, birds may not be able to eat or drink causing eventual death.

Fowl Pox can often begin as the wet form and spread as the dry form and vice versa. Also, this virus can appear in both forms simultaneously.

The duration of the Fowl Pox virus is approximately 10 – 14 days; however, if an entire backyard flock is infected, the duration can extend for several more weeks. Most chickens will be immune following recovery period. A small percentage though will remain carriers and succumb to the virus when feeling stressed.

For further reading...

https://www.backyardchickencoops.com.au/taking-the-pain-out-of-fowl-pox
 

Wyorp Rock

🐓 ❤ 🐛
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Sep 20, 2015
36,668
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Southern N.C. Mountains
@Jdelage87 Can you post some photos?

@coach723 gave you very good information in POST#3 I encourage you to read the link she provided as well.

Dry pox usually runs it's course in several weeks with no real issues unless a bird is in a weakened condition. Birds usually survive dry pox. Wet pox is much more serious, and is also less common. It's best to leave the blisters/lesions alone, messing with them can spread the virus. Keeping things clean, especially feeders and waterers can help prevent the spread. Monitor them to make sure they are eating and drinking normally. If you are in an area where mosquitos are prevalent then putting window screen over all your coop openings can help prevent them from being bitten at night while roosting, which can decrease your incidence. I put screen over the door also, cut in strips that hang down loose, so the birds can still go in and out, but not the mosquitos. There are lots of articles on pox, here is one:
https://the-chicken-chick.com/fowl-pox-prevention-treatmen/
:goodpost:
 

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