Framing questions - weather issues

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by kiwiegg, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. kiwiegg

    kiwiegg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2009
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    Hi all.
    I'm really amped up about starting my coop. I know that if I wait until spring (when we are getting chicks) it will be rushed and I won't enjoy the build as much. I live in Minnesota and although the weather is great right now, it is going to get nasty soon. So here is my question;

    I can pre-build wall frames in garage and have space to store them there, but I would rather get them onto base right away. If I'm using NON-TREATED lumber will a winters worth of moisture damage framing if I don't make it past framing stage? I intend on using treated for the base but was thinking of using interior grade 2x4s for the framing as my coop will have painted T1-11 siding and a proper roof and it's cheaper than treated. Or do I need to use treated for all framing?

    Thanks and I'm sure more questions to come!
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    I would worry more about warping and blowing over. Until you have a 'skin' on the building (or good thorough diagonal bracing) there is not a whole big lot preventing things from going somewhat or entirely cattywhompus.

    As far as just the effect of weathering/rotting the wood, it depends on the situation. IME plain (non p/t) lumber outdoors does not do too terribly over the span of like one season or one year if it is up off the ground and supported in a way that after it gets wet it can all dry out again reasonably quickly. Like a fenceboard, or exposed pieces of structure of a building. However if a winter's worth of snow lays against the bottom part of the wall, or if it is among dead grass or a drift of leaves piles up against it, that portion will *not* dry out so well in between wettings, and may very well have enough rot set in that it softens undesirably and you lose a significant amount of longevity. So it kind of depends what your situation is like.

    I would guess in Minnesota, though, that snow, if nothing else, would be an issue and thus I would probably be disinclined to leave a bare-bones-frame-only shed up over the winter. At the very least, use screws or double-headed nails to slap some THOROUGH diagonal bracing on all four walls and the roof, to increase your chances of it still being upright and squareish come springtime.

    (e.t.a. - no, don't use treated wood for your framing (except the bottom sill). It's kind of a waste of money and chemicals, it's heavier, it's crappier wood (more inclined to twist and split), and has much more stringent requirements for what screws/nails/hinges/etc you use. Plain ol wood is FINE, since it will be covered by siding and roof.)

    JMHO,

    Pat
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2010
  3. kiwiegg

    kiwiegg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2009
    Minnesota
    Thanks Pat.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2010
  4. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    Last edited: Oct 21, 2010
  5. kiwiegg

    kiwiegg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2009
    Minnesota
    Thanks Lynne. So are you suggesting using treated lumber for all?
     
  6. Luckytaz

    Luckytaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kiwi, How large will your coop be? If not to large it could be covered with a tarp. If you can't get it closed in, I'd wait till spring. Framing it all with treated lumber,
    would be a waste.
     
  7. kiwiegg

    kiwiegg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2009
    Minnesota
    Thanks Luckytaz. It's going to be a 8x8 walk in with a 9' peak. I think you are right about waiting re wasting money on treated lumber-you know the snow will be here real soon. I do have plenty of room in a detached garage so I might just start making floor and wall frames and keep them in garage. Once I get a bee in my bonnet....
     
  8. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

  9. rrgrassi

    rrgrassi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you did not want to use treated lumber you could always use Thompson's water seal.
     
  10. goldtopper

    goldtopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mine's 3/4 done, an A Frame and I have stained and waterproofed with Thompsen's. Looks great and in case I don't have it completed before the snow flies, I'll not worry. I'm not getting my birds till Spring.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2010

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