free ranging why?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by arabianequine, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. arabianequine

    arabianequine Crowing

    Apr 4, 2010
    Why is it ok for chickens to free range but not rabbits? I don't have rabbits but heard of people on here saying it was illegal to let them loose. I was just wondering why not trying to start a debate.....so hurry and answer my question please because it is inevitable.
     
  2. SarahFair

    SarahFair Songster

    Sep 23, 2008
    Monroe, Ga
    lol
    I free range mine. I guess its a factor of they might dig a hole and get out or slip through the fence. I have the welded wire fencing and Flemish Giant rabbits so there is no sneaking past that.
    Ive never seen them dig a hole on their own. Ive seen them add to a hole but I just filled it back and they havent touched it again. My male has been free ranging for about 3 months now. The only problem I have with it is the goats and chickens wanting his feed.
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    There are no native chickens, so if yours go feral, they do not interbreed with the wild ones, contaminating the genetics. There are wild rabbits so if domesticated rabbits get loose and interbreed with the wild population of rabbits, the genetics are contaminated. Same thing with turkeys.
     
  4. SillyChicken

    SillyChicken Crowing

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    to add to ridge runners comment... rabbits are quick breeders and could over populate an area and become distructive.
     
  5. chick4chicks

    chick4chicks Songster

    Apr 6, 2008
    N.E. Pa.
    I don't free range mine because I am afraid predators will get them but they do get put out on grass everyday inside the top of a rabbit cage so they still get the benefits of free ranging without the risks.
     
  6. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Quote:North American wild rabbits and domestic rabbits cannot interbreed. They are entirely different species, even different genera, they are too distantly related to create viable offspring. However, they do share certain parasites and diseases. The process of domestication has robbed the domestic rabbit of some of the skills necessary to fending for itself in the presence of predators; with normal predator pressure, they don't survive for long. However, humans have a deeply ingrained dislike for predators, and have removed them from most "civilized" areas. The feeling seems to be mutual; most predators will avoid areas of human activity if they can. If domestic rabbits are released in an area where the local predators are too small or too few to keep them under control, the unnaturally large litter size of the domestic rabbit, plus its unnatural ability to breed year-round, can lead to a fairly large population in a relatively short time. As SillyChicken said, they can become very distructive. Feral rabbits, while very skittish, lack the truly wild instinct to avoid people, and usually live very close to humans, digging up plantings, eating gardens, and generally making a nuisance of themselves.
     
  7. RabbitMage

    RabbitMage Songster

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    Rabbits are also more sensitive to changes in weather conditions. A rabbit that gets wet in cold or windy weather might not make it through the night, a rabbit in 85+ degree weather may die of heat stroke. They're also more sensitive to predators-the presence of something the rabbit sees as a danger can get them into a bad enough panic to kill them.
     
  8. noahsgeese

    noahsgeese Border Collie

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    I am not a rabbit person but I think that they dig out holes?
     
  9. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    So. Cal.
    Quote:North American wild rabbits and domestic rabbits cannot interbreed. They are entirely different species, even different genera, they are too distantly related to create viable offspring. However, they do share certain parasites and diseases. The process of domestication has robbed the domestic rabbit of some of the skills necessary to fending for itself in the presence of predators; with normal predator pressure, they don't survive for long. However, humans have a deeply ingrained dislike for predators, and have removed them from most "civilized" areas. The feeling seems to be mutual; most predators will avoid areas of human activity if they can. If domestic rabbits are released in an area where the local predators are too small or too few to keep them under control, the unnaturally large litter size of the domestic rabbit, plus its unnatural ability to breed year-round, can lead to a fairly large population in a relatively short time. As SillyChicken said, they can become very distructive. Feral rabbits, while very skittish, lack the truly wild instinct to avoid people, and usually live very close to humans, digging up plantings, eating gardens, and generally making a nuisance of themselves.

    Yes, look at what happened in Australia when they introduced rabbits. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia.

    Somewhat related...if you want to see a REALLY good movie check out "Rabbit Proof Fence". It's a family film based on a true story.
     
  10. thechickenguy

    thechickenguy Songster

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    i have about 30 running loose but i dont dare post any more pics of them free ranging. for some reason i always end up getting yellled at by ppl. but thts not the point. but i dont see why there is anything wrong with free ranging your rabbits.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2010

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