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Frostbitten comb HELP!!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by krv, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. Cottage Rose

    Cottage Rose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This is not true in most cases.
    Living in the north we deal with this often.
    I've never treated frost bite and none of my frost bit victums ever became infected and certainly none died.
    The frozen parts will atrophy and fall off.
    No big deal.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2009
    1 person likes this.
  2. weloveourchicks

    weloveourchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am in the same situation; just went down to the coop and my Brown leghorn roo looks as if he has frostbite. His wadddle is black and actually bleeding some [​IMG] Would that be frostbite? I am headed down to put neosporin on it, is that correct? Any advice is appreciated.

    Also, just wondering if it is frostbite and his waddle turns black and falls off, will it grow back?

    - - Susan
     
  3. Cottage Rose

    Cottage Rose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, your roo most likely has frostbite.
    The of winter 2001 we experienced some night time low temps of -25ยบ.
    One of the roo's got frost bit wattles.
    It didn't help that they draped into the water everytime he was drinking.
    The tips were red, very swollen, turned black and evetually atrophied and fell off.
    I don't remember that I did anything special for him.
    He survived just fine and no they do not grow back.
    Don't worry...he will probably be fine.

    A tip for cold climate chicken lovers...
    get breeds with pea or rose combs
    and ones that don't get real big wattles.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2009
  4. The Chicken Lady

    The Chicken Lady Moderator Staff Member

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    If injured, combs and wattles do not grow back. It's similar to a human losing part of a finger.
     
  5. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Sometimes the tips may grow back a little bit, but when too much is damaged, nothing will grow back except for some of the skin in the area that was actually damaged.

    Like the chicken lady said, it's similar to injuring your finger. If you only lose the very tip (the skin), it will grow back, but as soon as you lose more (Where the bone starts), it will not grow back.
     
  6. mksenoj

    mksenoj Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with this very much. We are in NY and have this problem.


    Quote:
     
  7. carpetbeggar

    carpetbeggar Out Of The Brooder

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    So someone asked about neosporin and or polysporin on the waddles and combs...Is this a good idea or should we just stick with Vaseline, a poly/neo/Vaseline mixture, or nothing at all?
    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  8. ZuulLanceMaster

    ZuulLanceMaster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read that you should cut it off....[​IMG] sorry to hear about it.... good luck!
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  9. baileychic

    baileychic Out Of The Brooder

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    Need to know what to do. One Rooster has wattles that have turned to ice cubes! I think he dipped them in the water one too many times. Anyway, they are awful looking. Is it too late for vaseline? Or should I grease him up?
     
  10. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Quote:Vaseline is just prevention. If they are fozen solid, the best thing to do once they thaw is to cut them off as the tissue will be dead. Removing dead tissue will prevent infection and gangerene, although, many dead extremities do fall off eventually.
     

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