Gardening Question

kbowma10

Hatching
May 18, 2015
1
0
7
Hello,

I am really wanting to start a garden but I don't know if it is to late to start one? I live in Ohio and I have tried to research what I could about gardening but honestly don't know much.I am interested in green beans, peas, tomato, carrots, zucchini, potato, peppers, maybe strawberry or raspberry. Could I plant all those together? Even if it is to late this year. Any help would be greatly appreciated and thank you in advance.
 

lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,615
27,005
917
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
Strawberries and raspberries are a "plant it this year, harvest it next year and every year there-after" crop. The other crops you've mentioned should reach harvest stage by 60 days. Perhaps a bit longer for potatoes. The important thing is to start right away. But, even if you don't plant until June 20, you should be able to get a harvest.

Some topics you might want to check into: straw bale gardening, "Lasagna Gardening" by Patricia Lanza. One of my personal favorites: (Quaint, and perhaps a bit tacky, but full of wisdom that will shake anyone out of the notion that "Gardening must be done this way, because that's the way it's always been done." : Anything by Ruth Stout. The book that got me headed down my "lazy gardener" path titled "Gardening Without Work." "Square Foot Gardening" by Mel Bartholomew. Back To Eden gardening, (I think by Paul ?) He has some neat videos on the net. I would suggest that you go to your library and check out a few books on gardening. You're bound to find something that will help you get started at a level that you are comfortable with.

The most important consideration when choosing a garden site is that it have LOTS of sunlight. A bare minimum of 6 hours/day. More is better. Sun gives your crops the energy to grow. Without sun, it doesn't matter how good your soil is. Of course good soil is important too, but that can always be improved. Also, you should start small. Nothing will sour a person on gardening more than having a garden that is too big to manage. Next, have your garden in a location where you can easily water with a hose.
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,296
20,164
907
Southeast Louisiana
There is some really good information in LG’s post. The thing I’d stress is to start small but start. There is nothing like a little success to get you coming back for more but burnout from being over-ambitious can ruin the experience for you.

There are all kinds of different ways to go about it. All gardening is local, we all have our different climates, methods, soil types, and preferred things to grow. What works for me might not work for you but many of the basic principles are the same.

I suggest you visit the sister site The Easy Garden. Join us and chat if you wish but at least lurk and see what we have to say about certain things to see if you want to join in. It’s a small friendly group scattered all over but between us we cover in the ground, square foot, container, raised bed, hanging baskets, hydroponics, and who knows what other methods. Most of us have chickens and/or other animals.

http://www.theeasygarden.com/
 

tuner06

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 22, 2014
61
2
41
Jarrettsville MD
My suggestion is to watch your wild life. Not sure where you live in Ohio but I
Live out in the Country lots of farms around me in Maryland. I started my garden in the
Beginning of April with getting the soil ready by May I had half of my garden planted
With cabbage, Brockley, cauliflower, and few other things. When to my surprise
I come out one morning to find it ruined had lots of things come in the night before (bunnies)
And ate it all so I had to replant everything which was another $120 out of pocket
But I fix them by fencing in my whole garden.
 

whoop whoop

Songster
Apr 26, 2015
1,123
119
138
Rainbow Nation
Gardening is relatively easy - water is the main thing - and companion planting is vital - Herbs in between veggies prevent a lot of bugs.Spraying everything with a mixture of crushed garlic and washing up liquid works very well. Plant seedlings in a small area then transplant when mature. Spinach does not die ever.

If you plant pumpkin allow it to mature then put the chickens in they will eat all the bugs that grow in the flowers and you will have a bug free crop.

I don't have a rabbit problem but do have a pigeon/bird problem so i put out food for them, to distract from the seedlings, and let my cats do the rest (sorry). Bunnies I can't help with - perhaps check what bunnies don't like to eat and spray it on everything...
 

Fluffnpuff

Songster
7 Years
Nov 6, 2012
153
24
104
Hello,

I am really wanting to start a garden but I don't know if it is to late to start one? I live in Ohio and I have tried to research what I could about gardening but honestly don't know much.I am interested in green beans, peas, tomato, carrots, zucchini, potato, peppers, maybe strawberry or raspberry. Could I plant all those together? Even if it is to late this year. Any help would be greatly appreciated and thank you in advance.

No it's not too late. Aim for plants that have around a 60 day maturity date. Plenty of zucchini and bush beans have around a 60 day maturity date. Other things that would fit into the time schedule are bok choy, kale, summer squash, and radishes.
 

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