geese eggs

LightedPrism

Songster
Nov 13, 2020
110
169
116
Cottonwood CA
OK I have a weird question and I figured you guys would possibly know...

My old community is full of ponds and one is full of im assuming pet geese that no one wanted. I say no one wanted because the duck pond is Extreamly well known in the area. BUT sidetracked. I was curious what would happen if a few people went through and collected some of the eggs and tried to hatch them.

1) would it be legal?
2) How would you go about doing it without (hopefully) dealing with the parents?

I ask for a reason, one of the other ponds with a bunch of geese, the county decided the geese needed to be taken away from the park. turned out that the county went through and collected a lot and last we heard they were pts.

we are trying to think of ways to curb that. and i thought, why not go to the start of the chain?
 

R2elk

*
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
35,987
175,954
1,661
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
My Coop
OK I have a weird question and I figured you guys would possibly know...

My old community is full of ponds and one is full of im assuming pet geese that no one wanted. I say no one wanted because the duck pond is Extreamly well known in the area. BUT sidetracked. I was curious what would happen if a few people went through and collected some of the eggs and tried to hatch them.

1) would it be legal?
2) How would you go about doing it without (hopefully) dealing with the parents?

I ask for a reason, one of the other ponds with a bunch of geese, the county decided the geese needed to be taken away from the park. turned out that the county went through and collected a lot and last we heard they were pts.

we are trying to think of ways to curb that. and i thought, why not go to the start of the chain?
Check your local and state laws.

If the eggs are from feral geese (abandoned domestic geese), it may be legal to collect the eggs. If the eggs are from Federally protected geese such as Canada Geese, Snow Geese, etc., it is illegal to collect or possess their eggs.

What governments can legally do does not mean a private citizen can do legally.
 
Last edited:

sourland

Broody Magician
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
May 3, 2009
127,728
402,819
2,027
New Jersey
In areas where goose overpopulation is a problem one method of population control is oil coating and addling of eggs. Before I tried taking eggs I would consult with local authorities, and of course Canada goose eggs are protected.
 

Ephyra

Songster
Apr 13, 2019
92
96
111
What about providing a home for the ones already there? You can easily remove the eggs if they're on your property. This would be the best way to stop the cycle and would save their lives. Unless you're going to collect eggs from nesting spots daily during the breeding season, there will always be more born. Domestic geese aren't adapted to survive in the wild, and they usually don't live very long due to predators, dogs, humans, cars, injuries that become infected, malnourishment, etc. You could also look into farm sanctuaries if you can't or don't want to take them in, but they're usually full in my experience.

There's a flock of domestic geese near my house. I've been trying to find a sanctuary for a long time, as I live in an urban area and can't take in all the ones that are there. Instead I feed them daily and provide medical care when necessary. We plan to take them in when we move to a more rural area. I just hope they survive that long.

However, I actually did exactly what you're asking about... incubating an egg from a feral domestic goose. When I had just known the geese for a few months (and knew absolutely nothing about geese/poultry animals), and was trying to help them through the winter by feeding them daily, one of the geese laid an egg right in front of me. At the time, I just couldn't bare the thought of just disposing of it..... so I spent the next 3 days obsessively reading and making notes about incubating, bought an incubator, and set the egg.

31 days later, the cutest little yellow ball of fluff was born. We had planned on giving her away due to the whole urban area thing, but the person changed their mind. It was just as well because she imprinted on me, and I imprinted on her too, haha. She brings me joy every day.

As long as you're certain they're domestic geese, there's nothing illegal about taking their eggs or the geese themselves, but always best to check your local laws and get permission from the park foreman.

I hope something can be done for them. Good luck!
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom