General framing questions:

rfeyer

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 12, 2014
53
9
33
Johnstown New York
For an 8x10 coop:

1- Are 2x4's PT enough for the floor?
2- Should I use 2x4 or 2x3 for the walls?
3- Are 2x3 enough for the roof, or should it be 2x4's? I am planning on metal roofing as I am in the snowy NE NY
4- do most of you close off the space from walls to roof tightly, or leave it open with Hardware cloth for ventilation (again, cold snowy NE NY)

Thanks in advance to anyone for advise

Rainer
 

Hokum Coco

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 6, 2012
4,241
3,464
467
New Brunswick,Canada
For an 8x10 coop:

1- Are 2x4's PT enough for the floor? I would go 2x6 @ 16"centers 8 feet is quite a span
2- Should I use 2x4 or 2x3 for the walls? I would got 2x4 @ 16"centers
3- Are 2x3 enough for the roof, or should it be 2x4's? I am planning on metal roofing as I am in the snowy NE NY I would got 2x4 @ 2 ft centers I would go minimum 3" / 12 pitch on the roof.
4- do most of you close off the space from walls to roof tightly, or leave it open with Hardware cloth for ventilation (again, cold snowy NE NY) some go with a ridge cap ventilation others box in the space and put in ventilation ports or even hinged or sliding panels but either would work (planed or dressed lumber is actually ½" smaller than called for in both demensions).

Thanks in advance to anyone for advise

Rainer
 

Egghead_Jr

Crowing
9 Years
Oct 16, 2010
7,098
2,843
406
NEK, VT
2x4's 16 inches on center for a 8 foot span will hold 50 lbs per square foot. They are plenty big. You need a doubled up 2x6 for the 10 foot span so that's 6 2x6 for the frame (assuming you want it raised off ground). Then use joist hangers on the 7 2x4x8's.

You really could use 2x3 for the wall framing. And 2x4's are again plenty to hold the snow load in NY which is 50 lbs per cubic foot to design for. A lot of sheds are just a one slant roof and with coops people leave that bottom and top ends open and covered with hardwire for venting.
 
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rfeyer

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 12, 2014
53
9
33
Johnstown New York
Thank you both - that is very helpful!!!!

I then have 2 more questions (I know, getting greedy):

I was thinking of a 4" on 12 pitch for coop roof with corrugated metal - or are shingles generally better to use? Mostly thinking of the ability to close the corrugation where metal hits wall sill. If the idea is to put 4x8 wood on the rafters, then metal is probably overkill?

Also,

for the run (which I am planning on 10'x20' for about 15 chickens:
- I am enclosing all three sides with Hardware Cloth
- Height appr 7 feet with covered roof

Q: Can I simply bury 2x4 or 4x4 PT posts into the ground (with buried Hardware Cloth) 3 feet apart and then do the roofing with Metal (or, again, would wood sheets and shingles be the better way to go).
BTW, roof also 4 on 12"

Again, any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Rainer
 

Egghead_Jr

Crowing
9 Years
Oct 16, 2010
7,098
2,843
406
NEK, VT
There are foam strips that you stick on the surface at end walls that collapses and fills the void on corrugated metal. You can get it at Home Depot for what? a buck a 4 foot strip?

If your going with metal roof just use strapping over the rafters and save on the plywood.

That's a lot of hardware cloth. Many folks use welded wire and then use the hardware cloth along the bottom to keep things from reaching in. If you lay fencing on ground and let grass grow through or lay in under the sod for a 18 inches that stops predators from digging. They will dig at fence and don't back up much. Hit the wire, try another spot along fence, hit wire...

You can put the 4x4's in the ground. Assuming your using the PT 2x4's to build a door.
 
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