Genetic Problems Associated with Certain Breeds?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ClareScifi, Jan 1, 2012.

  1. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2011
    I'm wondering whether there are certain genetic problems that certain breeds of chickens tend to display more frequently? If so, I'd be interested in which genetic problems are most associated with which breeds. If you have a link to this, I'd be very interested in it. Thanks!


    Clare
     
  2. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Not neccesarily breeds, but traits, like this:

    Japs = Creeper gene (short legs). 25% offspring die.
    Araucanas = Rumpless gene. 25% offspring die
    Crested ducks = Crested gene. All fully crested offspring die after a few weeks.

    There is also:

    Rosecomb bannies = Rose comb gene = fertility problems

    Is this the kind of thing you meant?
     
  3. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2011
    Yes, exactly, Banny, and also crop type problems. For instance, cockatiels have a tendency to have pendulous crops. I was reading that broiler birds are bred to fatten quickly and thus can have all sort of genetic problems from that-- getting too fat and getting fatty liver disease, etc.
     
  4. cubakid

    cubakid Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I have heard of silkies being born without skulls, which could be false of course.
    and also there are issues with inbreeding and weak genes in many breeds and lines.
    There is the stilt leg issue in some moderns(not an inherited gene, i believe.)
     
  5. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Quote:I have heard of silkies being born without skulls, which could be false of course.
    and also there are issues with inbreeding and weak genes in many breeds and lines.
    There is the stilt leg issue in some moderns(not an inherited gene, i believe.)

    Yes, the crested ducks we're used to seeing are only half-crested (Cr+/cr)
     
  6. cashdl

    cashdl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Willits
    It not the rumpless gene that is leathal, it is the tufting gene. It is 100% lethal in two copies. 25 % mortality has been observed in 1 copy.


    Lanae
     
  7. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Yep, in Araucanas it is the tufts not the rumplessness, and it is only know fully in cases of tufted bird x tufted bird. Since tufts are dominant, you can still, and most do, - breed tufted x clean-faced.

    Any frizzled variety have set-backs of frizzle x frizzle creating a 25% chance of a bird with frail and often balding feathers.

    Some colors of breeds are quite short in the genepool and thus often weak in vigor or fertility.

    Show and heritage type Cornish (real ones not broiler birds) often lack fertility or have very picky fertility.
     
  8. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Quote:Aahhh, looks like I got confused... Hence the 'Don't count you're Araucanas before Autumn'?
     
  9. MNShepherdess

    MNShepherdess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Seen an adult one of those before, we call them "Frankenfrizzles"...soooo ugly.

    Is true that sebrights tend to have lower fertility because of the hen feathering? I heard that somewhere.

    And that although it's not the rumpless gene, rather the tufted gene that causes the mortality rate, doesn't the rumplessness cause some problems in fertility as well?
     
  10. Ducks and Banny hens

    Ducks and Banny hens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 22, 2011
    On a little Farm.
    Quote:That's because of the Pea comb.
     

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