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Gold laced Wyandotte... Roo?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by fishandchix1, Oct 20, 2015.

  1. fishandchix1

    fishandchix1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have two gold laced wyandottes both about 8 weeks old. One has no comb or wattles while the other one is starting to get little wattles. Does this mean it's a rooster? Also it's tail feathers are sticking up a little bit more than the other... What do you guys think?

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  2. fishandchix1

    fishandchix1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
     
  3. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    Given the size and redness of the comb on the top bird, I'm leaning toward cockerel. I don't see anything screaming cockerel with the second bird so I'm thinking pullet on it. However, I would suggest re-posting both birds pics in about 3 weeks. By then their gender should be pretty obvious.
     
  4. StarMeKritten

    StarMeKritten Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At 8 weeks, my Wyandotte pullets usually have little pink wattles and the cockerels have much larger dark pink/ red wattles. I lean towards yours being female. If the comb and wattles stay fairly unchanged in color over the next few weeks, you have a female. If they keep getting significant larger and darker pink/ red, you have a cockerel.

    Here's a photo of a pair of my wyandottes at 2 months old. Female in the front and male in the back.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. CherriesBrood

    CherriesBrood Chicken Photographer Premium Member


    Agreed. I'm leaning more towards pullets for them both of them. I get a lot of ones that get tiny tiny combs and waddles early that end up being pullets. Tail feathers have nothing to do with gender. You can only tell if it's a roo "by tail feathers" when they start to get a shimmery glossy look to them, and the are getting long and slopping.
     
  6. fishandchix1

    fishandchix1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thankyou guys! Keep in mind both pics are the same bird so I'm a little bit confused, and the tail feathers in him are a little bit Rough so I'm wondering if he's being picked on or he's just showing signs of being a Cockeral... If he is a Cockeral when will he start crowing? I'm not even legally allowed to have chickens in my neighborhood or town so I need to get rid of him before that...
     
  7. CherriesBrood

    CherriesBrood Chicken Photographer Premium Member


    I don't think it's a cockerel, but if it does turn out to be one I'd get rid of him at 3–4 1/2 months. They usually start to crow at 4 1/2– 6 months.
     
  8. StarMeKritten

    StarMeKritten Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You don't need to worry about the tail feathers looking rough. They are just juvenile feathers. She will grow new prettier ones and lose those. On the odd chance that you do have a cockerel, he will most likely start growing shiny pointy male saddle feathers long before he starts crowing. My Wyandotte roosters usually start crowing between 4-8 months of age. They are a slower maturing breed. I have had cockerels of other breeds start crowing as young as 3 weeks old, though 3 months is much more typical!

    And keep in mind that hens can get pretty noisy too. They love to announce to the world that they have laid an egg.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2015
  9. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    The confusion (at least for me) is that I can't really see a comb in the second pic. I assumed it was just because the comb was very small, but with your statement and a second look, I'm assuming that the comb has been cut off by the left margin of the second picture.
     
  10. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    I agree I can't see the comb in the other picture and figured one was a cockerel and one a pullet - at that age.
     

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