Good news for 40- and 60-watt bulb sourcing

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Hooligans7, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. Hooligans7

    Hooligans7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Many of us in cooler climates have a fondness for 40- and 60-watt incandescent light bulbs, precisely because they give up 90% of energy used as heat. We use them in cookie tin water heaters, brooders, and other venues where we want to add heat — and some light, too.
    Most of us have heard that the "normal" 40 and 60 watters have been banned from sale in the U.S., and they have. But that's not the end of our favorite light bulbs. I spoke with an electric supply dealer very recently and asked him what could replace them.
    He said, "You don't have to. Two manufacturers, Westinghouse and Phillips, told us that they will continue to make a variety of standard-base, incandescent bulbs in those wattages and others. Since they are classified as 'specialty' bulbs, they're exempt from the Federal ban."
    So, good news for us — and our chickens!
     
  2. chfite

    chfite Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One particular term for an incandescent bulb still manufactured is a rough work bulb. Intended for a construction environment, it is physically more durable than an ordinary bulb.

    Chris
     
  3. Hooligans7

    Hooligans7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yep, I've used them in garage door openers and trouble lights. Their heavy filament can withstand shock and vibration better than standard bulbs — a good thing since I'm within "shaking range" of the New Madrid fault. We have tremors fairly often, which we hope relieves some pressure and buys some more time before the "big one."
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Don't rough work bulbs have a coating...that can be toxic to birds?
     
  5. Hooligans7

    Hooligans7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I believe just the "Coated Rough Service" type has the coating, and most manufacturers have switched from teflon to silicone (however I don't know if they've been tested for toxic fumes). The other heavy duty bulbs don't have a coating, but they still feature more filament supports and many are equipped with a heavy-duty 130 volt filament, allowing them to last longer when operated at 120 volts. You can buy 75 and 100 watt bulbs of that type as well. If you bump them hard enough, however, the glass will still break into pieces.
    Check out http://www.1000bulbs.com/category/rough-service-light-bulbs/
     
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  6. dokieday

    dokieday Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have decided to use ceramic infrared emitting heaters because I mainly use the incandescent bulbs to keep chicks warm at night during my hatching season. They are used with reptiles and don't emit any light just heat. Hoping to find one that has thermostat if not going to invest in a plug that does have thermostat. Still going to watch them so don't get to hot.
     
  7. Hooligans7

    Hooligans7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those IR heaters usually have a thermostatically controlled operating cycle, but don't tell you the actual temperature range. Here's a device that can control any type of heater based on selected temperature, up to 90F where the device plugs in, which means you can have it hotter a few feet away — http://www.amazon.com/Lux-Heating-Cooling-Programmable-Thermostat/dp/B000E7NYY8
     

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