Got a new Roo ^_^

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by torilovessmiles, Oct 2, 2014.

  1. torilovessmiles

    torilovessmiles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 19, 2014
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    He's a six month old Production Red, our first rooster! Ain't he perty? [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    We were looking for a breed known for being super gentle, but a friend offered him to us because she has a feisty little bantam rooster that kept beating up on him and nearly made him lose his eye. He is too timid to fight back. So we went to look at him, and we had to take him!

    So far, he is a sweetie. His original owner said they hadn't handled him much, but he lets us pick him right up, doesn't run from us, and falls asleep on our laps, lets us pet him and mess with him. As of right now, he is more friendly than our hens!
    He hasn't showed any aggression to my girls, but he won't really approach them either. My lead hen is not too fond of him.. It's only been a couple days since he's been around the girls, though. I'm hoping he'll warm up and establish his place on top within a few weeks.
    Any tips for adjusting a hen-only flock to a new rooster / managing any bad roosterly behavior if it starts?
    Thanks :)
     
  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Feb 18, 2011
    Ohio
    Pretty boy! Hope he works out for you. Not sure if you have seen it, but there is a nice article in the Learning Center on keeping a roo with tips for dealing with various behaviors as they crop up https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/keeping-a-rooster Handling / training isn't going to make all the difference on how likely a rooster is to wind up being human aggressive, a large part seems to be genetic, so there is no way to know for sure what you have until the roo is mature.
    As long as the girls aren't beating him up, you can probably just let him be at this point (rather than separating him out and doing a slow divided by wire type introduction, as he matures he should naturally gradulally take his place at the top of the pecking order.
     

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