(Graphic) Injured Chicken, Not Sure What Predator

Mariahthebright

Chirping
Jan 27, 2018
29
37
59
Central Illinois, USA
Looking for advice for my hen. Came home from work to find her outside of the coop perched our wood pile. Usually she goes in with the other hens at night. Recently, I have seen an opossum hanging out around the coop sometimes.

Any idea what could do something like this? She was attacked inside our run.

Besides cleaning it out and spraying vetcetriyn is anything recommended? How I should go about keeping feathers out of the wound so they do not heal into it?

20181126_191807.jpg 20181126_181739.jpg
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
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Trim back any feathers that are getting in the wound, you can use small scissors. Flush the wounds out well, you can use saline, veterycin, etc. Once it's clean you can put some plain neosporin on it. You will need to keep her separated until she heals so that the wound doesn't get pecked by other birds. You will need to monitor for infection, often times they heal up just fine as long as there are no internal injuries. If you do see signs of infection then you would need to start her on an antibiotic, many times that's not necessary. Make sure she's eating and drinking well. If you have not done so, check her over really well for any other wounds, often times they are hard to see, and you don't want to miss any.
Is your run completely enclosed and covered? What kind of wire? Some predators will reach through large wire and try to pull them through.
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
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Catalonia, Spain
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Poor hen.
Cut the feathers about an inch around the wound.
It sounds like you've got the cleaning sorted.
I would find out if you can get antibiotics quickly if you need them.
I would use this to seal the wound. It's a bit unorthodox but I've used it a lot on injured chickens here and it hasn't failed yet. The important thing about it is it will seal the wound when applied properly and that is the most important part of recovery. A sealed wound won't need constant cleaning and bacteria can't get in.
See what you think.
https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...s-and-injuries-with-stockholm-hoof-tar.74400/
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
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Since this is an unknown predator attack, I would be inclined to leave the wound open. Sealing in bacteria would just make it worse and really set it up for infection, and most predators are loaded with bacteria.
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
17,677
138,437
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Since this is an unknown predator attack, I would be inclined to leave the wound open. Sealing in bacteria would just make it worse and really set it up for infection, and most predators are loaded with bacteria.
Well, I must have used this method on at least a dozen injuries to date; some a lot worse looking than the above. Proper cleaning before applying the tar will kill any bacteria present.
Anyway, the link is there should the OP decide to read it.
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,551
10,948
611
North Florida
I never argue with what works for someone, just my opinion and what has worked for me. :) That's what I like about this forum, lots of different experiences and options to share.
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
17,677
138,437
1,582
Catalonia, Spain
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My Coop
I never argue with what works for someone, just my opinion and what has worked for me. :) That's what I like about this forum, lots of different experiences and options to share.
It's just a bit unusual for this forum anyway. I haven't taken any offense. We suggest as you say what our experience has been. Here much of the medication that is easily available in the US isn't so easy to get here, although strangely the heavy duty drugs get given out like sweets.
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
17,677
138,437
1,582
Catalonia, Spain
My Coop
My Coop
I’ve been lucky here in not getting many sick fowl. The other side of the coin is I’ve had an awful lot of injured fowl over the years. The most common is goshawk attacks which tend to leave gapping back wounds and stripped back skin. They look absolutely shocking but often the wound depth isn’t that deep and the problem is reattaching large flaps of skin. I have finally learned how to stitch these.
I have also been lucky in having an absolutely wonderful vet who thinks I’m completely crazy treating chickens but has stuck with me and knowing where I live and how much I care about the chickens has equipped me with medication and shown me how to do some things for myself.
Yes, it's always a challenge to help people who are in a different part of the world not knowing what is available easily and what is not.
 

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