Grit or sand

Retiree2013

In the Brooder
Nov 15, 2020
15
41
36
I have been tossing some gravel that is under the gravel in my driveway and some sand in my chicken yard. Since my birds are in a fenced in yard I am deciding on buying actual grit. My birds seem very healthy and are starting to lay a few eggs at age 20 weeks . I have 12 hens and one rooster now. They are on Layena feed , oyster shell in the yard, a few grubbies every other day. Just curious about the grit , sand , or gravel. Looking for input.

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DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
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I have been tossing some gravel that is under the gravel in my driveway and some sand in my chicken yard. Since my birds are in a fenced in yard I am deciding on buying actual grit. My birds seem very healthy and are starting to lay a few eggs at age 20 weeks . I have 12 hens and one rooster now. They are on Layena feed , oyster shell in the yard, a few grubbies every other day. Just curious about the grit , sand , or gravel. Looking for input.

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I'd supply granite grit. It's very inexpensive and a good insurance policy that the birds are getting what they need to thrive.
I'd also convert the flock to All Flock, Flock Raiser or a good chick starter and leave the oyster shell on the side.
Your cockerel doesn't need the extra calcium at all and when your pullets become hens and go into their first molt, they won't need the extra calcium then either.
A great side benefit of providing one of the feeds mentioned is they all offer a better protein level than any layer mix I've seen. It's better to offer 18-20% than the bare minimum of 16% when it comes to protein, especially when combined with low protein treats (not that you are feeding low protein treats).
 

kerbotx

Songster
5 Years
Aug 29, 2016
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The idea behind buying poultry grit is that it's properly formulated - the right size, the right roughness, the right insoluble composite. IMO sand is too fine for adult birds; if they eat too much of it, it can cause crop impaction. What you have readily available on your land might be okay, might not. I buy the grit because it's cheap enough, and it lasts a long time; one less thing to worry about!
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
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Jul 3, 2016
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Gravel is fine as long as your gravel is hard, sharp rock (granite is the usual standard) and roughly this size:

grit2.png
 

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