Grr, why is this happening

NNYchick

Crowing
Jun 15, 2017
1,518
2,553
261
Harrisville, NY
my Silkies have frost on top of their feathers this morning. We were -10 last night with the windchill but about zero in the coop. I have a 2ftx16ft open area on the east wall for ventilation it runs the length of the middle 16 ft section and all other windows closed, none of the coop has frost. I have 16 Silkies in 28ft x 8ft, it is open end to end the long way. Anyone else have Silkies that have seen this. The only thing I can think of is it’s the way they sleep piled up. No one has signs of frost bite or seem stressed. This happened last year that’s why we built on the 8x8 section so they would have a more enclosed area, but left it open to the 16ft area for ventilation. Just not sure what to do. Any suggestions?
0B7D0FEE-6F01-4F96-817A-0AE11D81BBD9.jpeg
A30F9232-216E-4222-A543-B70F4DC9CB61.jpeg
549D1EE1-0AB9-4A60-8194-FBE3BC032A26.jpeg
4F2B1BBD-869F-421F-82CC-D4D2B624E30F.jpeg

AA7F2368-54DD-43E6-AAF6-F99C3D1ACA87.jpeg
 

NNYchick

Crowing
Jun 15, 2017
1,518
2,553
261
Harrisville, NY
Yes they all sleep together in a pile, I was thinking it’s there breath on each other too, or there big fluffy crest are a magnet of the moist air as the breath. They have roosts, they use them during the day but at night they just pick a corner and all huddle together,which is typical for Silkies. There is no dampness or wet areas in the coop. I just curious what I might be missing, sometimes fresh eyes on a situation picks up something that is being overlooked or if anyone else has this with their Silkies.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
95,008
125,656
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
It could very well be because of the piling...and the fluffy.
Since they can access the roosts, I'd start putting them up there after dark until they get with the program.
Was going to suggest further examination of humidity, but if no frost anywhere else in the sleeping part of coop it's probably not necessary.
 

NNYchick

Crowing
Jun 15, 2017
1,518
2,553
261
Harrisville, NY
Well now I have condensation. We have warmed up to 40 degrees and everything is melting. It’s not just the coop the it’s just humid out. I opened all the windows and spread a thick layer of AG lime on the bedding and mixed it in with a pitchfork. I’m debating whether I should add more shaving or wait till it’s less humid? Any other suggestions?
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
95,008
125,656
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
Well now I have condensation. We have warmed up to 40 degrees and everything is melting. It’s not just the coop the it’s just humid out. I opened all the windows and spread a thick layer of AG lime on the bedding and mixed it in with a pitchfork. I’m debating whether I should add more shaving or wait till it’s less humid? Any other suggestions?
I have beau-coup ventilation and get condensation inside the coop during thaws, especially if there's still snow on the roof. Adding more bedding or stuff to bedding to absorb the moisture won't help much, IMO. Just wait.

This roof is 1x boards with tar paper and asphalt shingles...and a foot of snow during a thaw the underside was running with condensation. Bedding was damp...took days to dry back out....then another thaw. SMH.
upload_2018-11-25_10-18-8.png
 

NNYchick

Crowing
Jun 15, 2017
1,518
2,553
261
Harrisville, NY
That’s what I was thinking about the bedding too. I’ll add fresh when we freeze again. I stress too much about this coop. I’m always worried I’m doing something wrong that will hurt them. The chickens are happily going about their business and don’t seem stressed. I’ll take my cues from them.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,195
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
Hoard frost on their feathers is a sure sign that you have insufficient ventilation in your coop. Silkes are for a better word "OPEN" feathered so they are a little less insulated from the cold as tight feathered chickens are.

Lose the idea of wind chill. Wind chill was first invented in WWII by the US Navy who experimented in the Antarctic with gallon buckets of water suspended 100 feet in the air. Wind chill is a way of determining how much faster heat is lost from water as the wind speed rises. You are quite capable of freezing to death at +50 degrees F if you are exposed t0 50F moving air... long enough.
 

MANNA-PRO

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom