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Guardian Goose

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Chickmamma29, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. Chickmamma29

    Chickmamma29 Just Hatched

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    Feb 18, 2017
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    Hey guys!
    I have done a search through other similar topic threads under guardian Goose for chicken protection, but am not seeing the answer to my question.

    I am a fan of watching Justin Rhodes videos on YouTube, and he talked about having just ONE Goose as a guard Goose for his chickens. I am sure he explained that you could only have one Goose, then he will think he is the same as the chickens and guard them. If you have more than one, they will know they are different and only look out for each other, not the chickens.

    Did I learn this correctly? Any experience? I know they have to be babies together. I am looking at a Roman Tufted.
    Any of your guidance is appreciated!!
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    You should never have just one goose, ever. They are flock animals and need at least one friend of their own kind. To do otherwise is cruel to them and would be akin to locking you up with just chimpanzees for company in the hopes that you'd get along with them and protect them because you have no other humans to be with and they're the best you can do.

    I'm not even saying this just because I've heard it around, I experienced it. My first roman tufted grew up here without any other goslings or geese because her intended mate died in transit on the way to me. Sure, she hung out with the chickens and ducks, but she wasn't really happy. Once I got some more geese she immediately took to them and they are now an inseparable flock. I would never want to have another lone goose again because it's just cruel to the goose.

    That said, I raise Roman Tufteds, keep them in with chickens, and they do watch out for predators and alert to them. That's all they're going to do, and that's all any goose would do. A goose is never going to attack or try to drive off a predator, aside from perhaps a gander protecting his mate on the nest. Even then, he's probably still going to lose out to anything larger than a small fox.

    So, what geese will do is watch for danger, alert if they see it, and their presence and size may deter small raptors from attacking. That's it. Don't expect to get a goose and have it attacking and chasing predators and driving them off, and please do not get just one.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2017
    3 people like this.
  3. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree with pyxis.

    I had toulouse years ago. Nice goose and protective gander. That protection did not apply to predators.
    We had a horrible and sudden hail storm. At first they and the ducks went into the shelter. The hail was so loud it drove them out. The gander stood next to a corner fence post, spread his wings and took a horrible beating so the ducks and his mate could hunker under them.

    I still lost goslings and ducks at night to predators. Geese sleep soundly just as chickens do. To easy for a predator to get past the goose and have a chicken dinner.
     
  4. Chickmamma29

    Chickmamma29 Just Hatched

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    Feb 18, 2017
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    Thank you so much for both of your views, experience and knowledge. This helps me a lot.

    I definitely understand the difference between protection and alerting. We have a lot of hawks, crows, etc up above, and I know the guard Goose is good to have when the chickens are in a poultry fence grazing.

    I did not know about the loneliness issues. I watch several YouTube homesteaders, and they all have one Goose with their chickens.

    Again, thanks for your help!!
     
  5. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    I'm glad you know what kind of protection that geese actually offer, and hopefully you will not get just one. All those homesteaders are perpetuating the myth that it's fine to keep one lone goose, but if they'd think about it at all they'd realize that just as they wouldn't want to live with another animal species their whole life that can't speak their language, can't become their mate, can't raise young with them, and can't even participate in their favorite activities (swimming, in the case of geese) that it's not something that's okay to do to a goose either. They are innately flock animals, just as chickens are and just as we humans are.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Chickmamma29

    Chickmamma29 Just Hatched

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    Amen! Thanks again for your wisdom!
     
  7. Birdydeb

    Birdydeb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Replying after you already have your answers but just wanted to reiterate what has been said. I find it astounding that anyone could think keeping one goose is okay( I know you have reconsidered by your responses). I had the same situation as Pyxis....my goose's mate died not long after their arrival last year. She has grown up with my ducks and I love that silly goose. She will honk like crazy if she sees a threat and the ducks pay attention....the drake will come and stand near her and watch. She gets along fine with my little flock of ducks but it is obvious that she is alone. She was a late hatch last year(June) which meant my repeated efforts to find a goose friend for her were fruitless. :( I have finally given up and have ordered more just like her this year. She is a Tufted Buff and she is a fantastic early warning system but will run for cover just as quickly as the ducks. Watching her interactions in the duck pen reminds me of the kid who is tolerated in a group but still just not cool enough to totally interact. They have all grown up together but still it is just different for her. I have agonized over a buddy for her and that anyone willingly thinks a lone goose is acceptable breaks my heart. Because of her I have fallen in love with geese and now I would NEVER recommend anyone just getting a pair as I did(live and learn) because of the possibility of one dying and causing one to be alone. I truly wish I had ordered a trio in hindsight. Just my personal thoughts and observations. I cannot wait for her to have a couple buddies. :)
     
  8. Flock Master64

    Flock Master64 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What about turkeys?
     
  9. jmdelsanto

    jmdelsanto Just Hatched

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    Hi everyone! I'm so thankful Chickmama posted this question! My sister just received her Chinese gosling pair, with the intention of raising one as a guard goose (like Justin Rhodes); whenever we pick this one particular goose up, the other cries, and starts looking for the other. It's so heartbreaking.

    Knowing now that she will probably keep both, can you still integrate the pair in with the chickens? If so, when does this process typically happen? Based on information we sought prior to beginning this process, we have even more questions now. Some age information - the chicks are two weeks old, and the goslings were just born March 13th.

    Thank you all!
     
  10. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    Go ahead and put them together now :) They'll grow up together and be fine and happy with each other's company. I'm so glad your sister started with a pair and won't separate them. Just make sure the older chicks don't bully the younger goslings.

    Here's s picture of mine hanging out as juveniles.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.

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