Guinea Fowl vs Predators?

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by Welshies, Jun 14, 2017.

  1. Welshies

    Welshies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So, I recently lost $300 worth of birds to a very persistent (and well known chicken-loving) fox. I live in the country, but our birds (chickens, ducks, and quail) are kept half a mile away (long story, tough situation). Frankly, all 20 of my 9 week old Wyandottes and 20 8 week old Quail were killed after I made the mistake of free-ranging my chicks and the fox dug under the quail coop to get inside. The chicken coop is totally foxproof, though, and I've built pens. Yet I want to go even further and was wondering what people's experiences with guinea fowl as predator control were. I'd free range and let fly a pair of guinea adults...
    Mostly as an alarm system for the chickens and intimidation factor for predators.
    How well might this work?
     
  2. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    Just more fox bait and hawk bait---in my opinion. My chicken pens, rabbits, hogs, etc are 1/2 mile away to.
     
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  3. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

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    First, guineas are a flock bird and do better in large numbers. I never recommend getting fewer than 10 guineas to start with. The stories you hear about guineas driving predators away are done by flocks of guineas. A pair of guineas would be a very quick meal for a fox. Even large flocks of guineas are constantly losing members to predators.

    It is my opinion that with your current plans that you would just be providing a couple of meals for your predators.

    When bringing in adult guineas, it is best to confine them for approximately 6 weeks so they can imprint on their new home. Letting them loose too early will most likely result in them leaving while they try to find their old home and friends.
     
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  4. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    You really only have maybe 3 good options, Remove the predators, remove the predators feed or tighten up security----no free ranging, fox/predator proof pens, even a Good Guard dog like a Great Pyrenees----which does remove its(predators) food and it will usually go some where else to find a meal..
     
  5. Welshies

    Welshies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What do you use to ward off foxes?
     
  6. Welshies

    Welshies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Have tried to shoot this fox multiple times.... Won't free range anymore, but my pens are not fox proof (chicken wire- double layered- strung tight to 4.5' tall metal posts with a 8" apron). No money for a guard dog- I am a teenager.
     
  7. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    A guy just told me he got a big live catch trap and throwed some raw chicken wings in the back and the Fox walked right in?? I have big live catch trap that has a live bait compartment that I have caught several bobcats but never seen a fox in the area of my chicken pens.
     
  8. Welshies

    Welshies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was actually thinking of, since I'm an avid trapper, putting the guinea fowl in the former quail coop (the one the fox dug into). Then placing a snare (most fox snares nowaday have technology that "locks" it so it doesn't kill them but only holds them there- smart in case we catch a dog.) in the entrace of the hole- and hoping it works. As well as sitting with a gun and waiting. I know which 2 foxes it is and before this we have NEVER had a problem, even with our coops being half a mile away and a coyote den 200m away from the coops.
     
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  9. BoogieBug

    BoogieBug Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm back again with another question. If I buy six more (1 week old) keets to go with the four (2-1/2 week old) keets, what would be the best way to integrate the new keets with the existing ones?
     
  10. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

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    I have gotten away with just putting different keets in the same brooder. You have to watch them for awhile to make sure the older ones are not hurting the younger ones. You also have to be aware that one week old keets should be kept at 85°-90°F while 2 1/2 week old keets should be able to be at around 80°F. If they all get along well together, the larger number of keets makes it so they can tolerate slightly lower temperatures than a smaller group can stand.

    Good luck.
     
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