Had to "Jail" one of my chicks

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bigdogmom130, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. bigdogmom130

    bigdogmom130 Songster

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    Glen Burnie
    I had to seperate one of my hens this afternoon. I came home to find her pecking the heck out of the other three girls. They just turned 7 weeks old yesterday and all of them have been so sweet up until now. The one who is doing the pecking is a Golden Comet and she is really favoring the tail feathers of my 2 Ameracaunas! I put Pine Tar on the Ameracaunas wounds and put her into a "chicky jail" which is a dog crate with a box inside for her. She is not happy at all! She's been peeping really loud and the others are joining in from the brooder.

    Did I do the right thing? They are going outside Saturday, but now I'm worried that she will peck them in the coop and I won't be out ther 24/7 to watch her. Any suggestions or advice?

    Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2009
  2. jenjscott

    jenjscott Mosquito Beach Poultry

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    maybe outside with a lot of stuff to do she won't bother them. I would at least give it a try. sometimes I think they just get bored.
     
  3. fourfeathers

    fourfeathers Songster

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    I have to put one of my little roos, the littlest, in Time Out almost every day because he has issues with my shoes and legs and pecks the fire out of me. With all the peck marks, it looks like I have a disease. Good luck with yours, maybe she won't like getting a beakful of the pine tar.
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Crowing

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    You did exactly the right thing. Keep her separated at least til after you get the others outside. She will then be at the bottom of the pecking order, and the new environment will also help shake up the pecking order. You should be able to tell pretty quickly how it will go if you reintroduce her outside.
     
  5. bigdogmom130

    bigdogmom130 Songster

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    Glen Burnie
    Thanks so much. I feel bad isolating her, but she seems to have calmed down. The loud peeping has stopped from both the brooder and the "jail". I'm hoping for the best when I put them outside tomorrow![​IMG]
     
  6. Lila_Brambleburr

    Lila_Brambleburr In the Brooder

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    We had a problem with our two ameraucanas - one totally bullied the other and pecked her to blood. I isolated the bully, giving the weaker one time to become a part of the flock and regain some confidence, but each time I released bully hen, she went at it again.

    The last time, she had her sister cornered behind a door, pecking the heck out of her, and I had enough. I went in and smacked her behind. Sent her flying away. She came back, I smacked her again. We did this a few times with the swats getting harder and harder, and I even flattened her on the ground in a submissive position, because I have seen the rooster do that to an errant hen. Finally, she gave up, and has never bullied her sister again.

    Oddly enough, our roo, who is fiercely protective of his hens, allowed me to do the disciplining without a hint of aggression towards me. He watched, but didn't make a sound. He had tried to stop them by pecking at the bully, but it didn't work. I think he knew what I was trying to do, because usually, if I even touch a hen and she complains just a little, he gets upset.

    We had been told to let them work it out, but when all else fails, sometimes we need to act on our instincts and try something different. Plus, then I got to joke endlessly about having spanked a chicken. [​IMG]

    I hope it works out for you!! [​IMG]
     
  7. bigdogmom130

    bigdogmom130 Songster

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    Glen Burnie
    Thanks! I talked to the owner of our local farm and feed store and she suggested smacking the hen a few times. I looked at her like she was nuts, but now that you mentuioned it on here I might have to go that route is she doesn't learn how to get along with the others. Thanks for the advice....hopefully it won't get to the spanking part.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2009
  8. fourfeathers

    fourfeathers Songster

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    I tried the smacking with my roo, and it only made him more aggressive. A squirt bottle, not in the face is an attack that they don't necessarily associate with you and sometimes can be a deterrent (when weather is warm).
     
  9. bigdogmom130

    bigdogmom130 Songster

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    Thanks again for all the advice. I've been continuing to put Pine Tar on the Ameracaunas, and they are outside as of today (all of them). Little Miss Meany continues to peck once in a while even with the pine tar on the others. She doesn't, however, pick on the other hen who is like her - another Golden Comet! I sat outside and even watched her peck a "fluff" feather off of one of the others necks and eat it! I've had her jailed for almost 4 days and hubby even smacked her bottom for her. I'm worried that she won't stop and that I may have to get rid of her. My son would be heartbroken - he loves this meany chick! Ughhh, I am at a loss here.......
     
  10. Mrs. Glassman

    Mrs. Glassman Songster

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    I think you did the right thing.

    I have a hen that is a CBOF. She is a great broody, but pecks the dickens out of everyone else, even her own hatchmates. She is now in a pen, with only a rooster. That way, I still get fertile eggs.

    I hated to seperate her, but it was that or the stew-pot for her.

    She was so mean to me (I have SCARS on my arms!) & all other living things, that I have to say, when that rooster mounted her, and road her like a surfer, I did take a little pleasure in knowing she'd met her match. [​IMG]
     

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