Handling Chickens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Booswalia, Sep 17, 2009.

  1. Booswalia

    Booswalia Chillin' With My Peeps

    Totally new to chickens here and I'm reading a few things that leave wondering how you handle a chicken.

    I've picked them up but that's about it. How in the world would you ever inspect their feet or clip their wings and such? Is there a secret to handling them?
     
  2. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    First off, I've never clipped my chickens wings. I don't see the need to. If they want to stretch their wings and fly, I let them. They can't get to far anyways! [​IMG]

    Second, for feet inspection or any other kind, I just pick them up and look them over. I've never had a chicken struggle to the point I can't look them over once I've picked them up.

    I would suggest you go out and practice! Pick a hen up and start looking her over. I bet she won't mind to much and you'll gain confidence while doing it. [​IMG]
     
  3. Booswalia

    Booswalia Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't want to clip their wings. That was just an example.

    So they don't struggle much after you pick them up? How would you look at the bottom of their feet?
     
  4. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    If I need to get a good look at the bottom of their feet, I usually have someone else hold them while I look. If you don't have any help, then sit with the chicken on your lap and tip her to where you can see her feet. Be careful not to keep a chicken on their backs to long if you have to hold them this way for the inspection as their lung could potentially collapse. It's best not to hold them upside down for this reason, but if you absolutely have to do it, take care not to do it for long.
     
  5. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

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    In a word, regularly. [​IMG]

    Even with one not used to being handled though, once you get them picked up and immobilized they generally calm down. To check the bottom of their feet I -- once they're picked up and calm -- tip them back, tuck them under one arm and ... look. [​IMG]
     
  6. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    The easiest time to handle your birds is at night. Most folks do the body checks and hands on care after the birds have gone to roost. Chickens are pretty pliable after they've settled in for sleep. Some folks handle their birds on a regular basis starting when they are young to get the chickens used to being held. Then it's easy from the get-go. I handled all my birds from the time we got them, but a few still don't like being held. Those I wait until later in the evening to work on. Chickens don't need to be checked closely very often. When I first got my birds I checked them over every inch every month, but over time I have slacked off. I can now look at my birds and see if their might be a problem by their behavior. The ability to do that comes with experience.
     
  7. Booswalia

    Booswalia Chillin' With My Peeps

    Everyone on this board is soooo helpful. Thanks.

    So if I want to do an "inspection", (mostly for the practice and to get them used to it), what should I be looking for?
     
  8. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    You could check for mites or lice by checking their vent area and under their wings. Look for grey or brown specks near the base of their feathers in those areas along with bugs crawling around.
     
  9. Booswalia

    Booswalia Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks Gumpsgirl. I'll give that a try later today.
     
  10. PeepsInc

    PeepsInc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hold the bird with your hand in front of the legs,with Ur fingers under the breast bone& thumb over the wing. They fuss less when there feet dont have a foothold.
     

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