Hands on hatching and help

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by AmyLynn2374, Feb 11, 2016.

  1. pipAchick

    pipAchick Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,137
    100
    150
    Mar 19, 2016
    VA

    4&half days. I'll try to get a better pic later. T hinken it's a backwards air cell,not sure yet though still reading old threads.
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,027
    2,531
    426
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    Well, that aint the way they are supposed to do it. I'd keep a close eye on him. If he stalls and seems stuck and there are no prominent veins, I'd help. His positioning may be hindering his ability to hatch.

    I THINK that alot of it has to do with the rough handling during shipment causing damage weakening the chick so that even if they develop, the chick is weaker. Some of it may have to do with positioning and the air cell. It's sad to know that they get that far and don't make it. It's easier to deal with non development or early quitters than late deaths.

    Yes. I feel an immense responsibility to "make the chicks live". The main reason I am as hands on as I am. I hate feeling like I failed them.
     
  3. BigWeenMachine

    BigWeenMachine Chillin' With My Peeps

    304
    31
    91
    May 6, 2015
    I'm in the same boat you are with shipped eggs. This is my first ever hatch and I have 26 shipped eggs going into lockdown Monday and Wednesday and 20 more going into lockdown in 3 weeks. I have noticed the air sacks on several of my shipped ones are fluttery or spread all the way down one side. I'm counting on those to quit at some point but I guess we will see.
     
  4. JillZ

    JillZ Out Of The Brooder

    59
    9
    31
    Mar 3, 2016
    I keep trying to think that in nature, so many eggs don't hatch for whatever reason because they aren't "meant to." But I can't get over the feeling that if I am going to try to incubate, that I should do it right (and that's such a variable!), that if the hatch fails, then I am 100% responsible.
    Could you please, for probably the 30 millionth time, explain the results of a too high humidity hatch and a too low humidity hatch? My humidity was extremely high last time and my struggler could barely make it out of a gray concrete membrane. So what should I be on the lookout for this time? I have all of my "assisting" tools ready, but need to be mentally prepared. Also, I'm seeing that many of you candle them if they are not hatching for whatever reason. Should I just give it time and if nothing happens by day 22, candle then? I'm just not having a good feeling and am second guessing a low humidity incubation.
    And I so agree about early quitters.
     
  5. BigWeenMachine

    BigWeenMachine Chillin' With My Peeps

    304
    31
    91
    May 6, 2015
    He is the one that is rocking the egg around like crazy and has been doing it since yesterday so I'm starting to wonder about helping him out. Still hasn't completely made a hole yet but he has 3 separate pecks that are all going up and down. I can see him pushing the crack up but he can't break through it. He's been pipped for 29 hours now. I'm starting to wonder if maybe my humidity needs to come down a bit cos maybe the shell is too rubbery to push through? Any thoughts? I've got one hygrometer reading 79 and the incubator hygrometer is reading 73.
     
  6. JillZ

    JillZ Out Of The Brooder

    59
    9
    31
    Mar 3, 2016
    When I received mine I let them sit for 24 hours at room temperature without turning. Then the 2nd day I incubated them without turning for 24 hours. The third day I began (auto) turning. Now I'm reading that some people let them sit for like 3 or 4 days in the incubator. I had two blood rings with them on around the 14th day. I kept one of those two that was a little questionable and it didn't make it to day 18. But only 2 didn't make it to day 18, so I felt really good about it. Most of the air cells seemed to kind of level out, but I have about 3 that are way down the side. I guess we'll see. Many, many people hatch shipped eggs well. Hoping for the best for you!
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2016
  7. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,027
    2,531
    426
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    Sure. If your humidity is too high over the course of the incubation the moisture in the air prevents the egg from being able to release moisture. When this happens the air cell does not grow like it should and the extra fluid in the egg can cause the chick to aspirate on it and essential drown. There's other things that is associated with high humidity such as chicks growing too big to turn, developmental problems and such.
    If your humidity is too low, the egg looses too much too fast. This can cause the inner membrane to dry out too much and pull down around the chick "shrink wrapping" it. If the chick is able to internally pip chances are it won't be able to move to make an external pip. Many chicks suffocate and aren't able to make the internal pip. I see more high humidity issues than low.

    The best way in my opinion to judge humidity is to monitor the air cells.
    My method is: http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com...anuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity

    Sometimes, it is better for the hatcher to go ahead and candle on the expected hatch day, in my opinion, if they are seeing no action. Sometimes just a hint of movement or seeing an internal pip is enough to calm our nerves and keep the hope going. But that's just my personal feelings on it.
     
  8. BigWeenMachine

    BigWeenMachine Chillin' With My Peeps

    304
    31
    91
    May 6, 2015
    I let one batch sit for 24 hours and other two for 36. Guess I'll see which ones hatch better
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,027
    2,531
    426
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    I hatch at 75% + it often goes up to between 80-90 after they start, though not for long. I don't know how different it is for ducks, I do chicks. I will say, if you have a pipper with a decent amount of membrane exposed, if it is exposed for an extended amount of time, even with high humidity and a hands off approach, it can still turn bownish and start to get leathery, especially in a forced air incubator. I've seen it happen.
     
  10. FridayYet

    FridayYet Innocent Bystander

    12,684
    4,386
    461
    Mar 3, 2011
    The Land of Enchantment
    Shipped eggs are a gamble. You may have them all hatch or you may have none of them hatch. From everything I've read, 50% is about average.

    You can't tell by looking whether they had a relatively easy trip, or if they were tossed around, left on s freezing loading dock, or in the back of a broiling truck.

    Eggs shipped shorter distances, with less transfers do better. The route makes a difference too, since certain hubs are notorious for beating up packages.

    All we can do is give them the best chance we can, and hope that the least damaged ones make it.
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by