1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Has anyone purchased a coop kit?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by cassidy22, May 24, 2011.

  1. cassidy22

    cassidy22 Chillin' With My Peeps

    192
    7
    93
    Apr 20, 2011
    Front Range - Colorado
    I have a lot of chickens and a lot of different styles of coop. I want a smallish coop to separate my Blue Andalusians and Speckled Sussex so I can breed them both. My husband builds the most ridiculous coops - some don't last very long either. And he takes months to almost a year to complete a project.

    I keep seeing coop kits online, most are really expensive. But I have found some that are not expensive, have covered runs (I can't have my roos fly away and join the other flocks) Some of the ones that seem in my price range are at www.flemingoutdoors.com. I need at least 6 birds in each coop, maybe room for up to 12.

    Has anyone bought these kits? They aren't incredibly expensive, but I'd still hate to throw my money away getting one and finding out it's junk and will just fall apart on me. If I want something that falls apart, my husband and I can make that!

    Thanks! I couldn't find any posts that spoke about purchased kits, lots of great ideas for coop designs. Some of which I really wish we had time to do, but I need something I can put together quickly.

    Thanks!


    Kristin
    Long Shadow Farm
    Colorado
     
  2. bryan99705

    bryan99705 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Your better building your own or have one built to your specs. No one knows your needs better than you. Look at every coop design you can find, Goggle, drive by, etc ... steal their good ideas ... and have the perfect coops for you. My neighbor had a old retired guy build theirs, it is beautiful and it cost them materials, a lot of iced tea and good conversation.
     
  3. zookeeper15133

    zookeeper15133 Chillin' With My Peeps

    789
    6
    123
    Apr 22, 2010
    SW PA
    Hi, their biggest coop is the barn and it is only big enough for 4 chickens. I agree with the previous poster. Look on here at the coops. Some of them have very good directions. Even if you don't like that design, you may learn about how to build. You can buy Chicken Coops for Dummies, I hear it is an excellent book!

    Build it yourself. You can do it!

    OR Check out Craigslist.com You may find one or someone to do it for you!
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2011
  4. Anianna

    Anianna Chillin' With My Peeps

    959
    10
    143
    Feb 28, 2010
    N/E of Richmond, VA
    I had been researching coops and found the pre-built ones and kit ones were almost always inadequate/too small for anything more than the smallest flock, especially if you have weather that will require you to keep your birds inside for any length of time. Anything less than 3 sq ft per bird can induce overcrowding behaviors and if you have to close your coop up for any length of time, like for long periods in the winter, you don't want anything less than 5 sq ft per bird. Also, if you want to breed them, you may want to have some nesting houses; smaller coops with their own runs sized for the broody momma and her chicks. This will keep other hens from laying eggs in her clutch and reduce stress on the new momma.

    If you get a kit, just make sure you get enough square footage to comfortably accommodate your entire flock. There are several books out there with plans and several include tips on proper building that may be helpful. I highly recommend a book called "How to Build Animal Housing" by Carol Ekarius (check your library for it). It has clear explanations on how to build and what materials to use as well as lots of plans for various animal houses including coops and nest boxes. Using the right materials is key to a long-lasting building. Spending a little extra for exterior plywood, for example, will prove to be a better investment than using standard plywood.

    You should design your own coop or use a design from a book or from the BYC coop collection. If you don't like the way your hubby does it, go for it yourself. It really isn't difficult once you get to it and it can feel very empowering to pound your own nails in. If you are worried you can't do it, go volunteer with Habitat for Humanity to get some building experience under supervision where you can observe how the basics work.

    Good luck!
     
  5. copperpot

    copperpot Out Of The Brooder

    40
    0
    22
    Apr 8, 2011
    Western Pennsylvania
    I am in Western PA and we purchased a coop kit from an Ohio company. With my husband working more than full time and me working part time, we needed all the help we could get. I know that we could have done it cheaper by buying the materials but to have the kit come in a panelized bundle with windows and hinges and even the screws to put it together (didn't need the table saw, hand saw, or saw blades) was a major blessing to us. We got ours from www.cottagekits.com (look at their coops page to get some ideas for yourself. They have some nice ones on there.) I think they also have an Amazon store where shipping is included.

    Good Luck and do what is best for you.
     
  6. mikecnorthwest

    mikecnorthwest Chillin' With My Peeps

    559
    8
    141
    Mar 27, 2009
    Vancouver, WA
    My Coop
    I would stay away from the coops pictured at Fleming. You're much better off building yourself or finding a contractor who will build one for you.
     
  7. Anianna

    Anianna Chillin' With My Peeps

    959
    10
    143
    Feb 28, 2010
    N/E of Richmond, VA
    Craigslist often has people who will custom build a coop for you, also.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by