Heat Lamp for Young Duckling and Sibling Question

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Dewnrb, May 30, 2017.

  1. Dewnrb

    Dewnrb Just Hatched

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    My little egg will hopefully hatch on June 5. I have read that it is supposed to stay in the incubator for 24 hours and then move out to a box with a heat lamp. Is that heat light a 100 watt reading light OR a 100 watt infrared heat bulb like is used for lizards. I was thinking with the infrared light, it could still have heat at night but not be under such bright light constantly (and at night!). I would think that it would need that differentiation of day and night. Would either work?

    Additionally, I just have the one egg - does anyone recommend buying a sibling (either little duck or chick) to keep it company so it does not get lonely? We can put a mirror in there - but I think the benefit of the mirror would only go so far. Would prefer to buy a duckling - but am having a hard time finding just one. Thanks in advance for the replies!
     
  2. Tenrec

    Tenrec Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You should get a sibling for the little duckling. Maybe even two siblings. Otherwise, the duckling will grow up thinking it's a little human and you will have to be around it 24/7 from birth to death. o A o

    What kind of little duckie you got going there?

    Also, if you get a heat lamp (there are other sources of heat like brooder plates and homemade wool hens), and you only have a small brooder to warm, I wouldn't use a 100 watt. My ducklings do just fine in their tub with a 60w. I've read that the infrared keeps them calmer, so you can try that. It's really more a combination of wattage, distance from brooder, insulation, ambient temp, etc that you're dealing with...You should first start off with a hot end reading at 90. Make sure it has a cool end it can escape to. Then adjust the lamp according to the behavior of the duckies. Cold duckies huddle and cry a lot, hot duckies crowd away from the lamp and pant.

    Be careful using heat lamps, always use the guard and follow directions on them. You don't want them touching anything that can burn up.
     
    firestomp likes this.
  3. firestomp

    firestomp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The red heat bulbs work great just mind the tem and how close it is to anything flammable. Around here, all of the Rural kings keep them way up into summer.
     
  4. Dewnrb

    Dewnrb Just Hatched

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    Thanks for the replies! I don't know what I have - my dog scared the mother duck off of the nest (in my fenced backyard). She did not return and I was so overridden with guilt that I bought an incubator and started researching hatching ducks. Trying to do right by this little thing and feeling very responsible and overwhelmed! Any advice helps!!
     
  5. firestomp

    firestomp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use a switch box with a 600 watt dimmer switch( was the cheapest ) a male plug on one end and a female plug on the other, make it any length you need. I use this to drop the temp over time in my brooders. But I hatch out quite a bit of critters, so it may not be cost effective.
     
  6. Tenrec

    Tenrec Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is mom a wild duck? Did you get a look at her?

    Read up on assist hatch and what to expect on hatching days for baby ducks. It's a little different than chicks, takes a little longer from internal pip to zip.

    Also, your little duckling needs the same chick starter as chickens, but will require a supplement for the b vitamins. Brewer's yeast is commonly used - either sprinkle the powder on their food or crush some of the tabs up for them.

    Your duckling needs a water dish that it can dip its nostrils in. However, you want to make sure the duckling cannot get into the water dish. It will, in the best case scenario, make a mess, and in the worst case scenario, drown. There are lots of ideas on here for duckling-proof water dishes...Ducks are a tricky mess in the brooder, to be honest.

    Make sure to use substrate in the brooder that gives the duckling a good grip. If the ducklings feet are slipping, the duckling will develop leg problems. I use pine chips. Make sure whatever you use is safe for them. The first few days, when the duckling is learning what food is and isn't, it's best to just put some paper towels over the substrate. If the duckling can't grip those, then a regular towel will do...Just make sure it has no holes or pulls in it.

    Let us know how she progresses.
     
  7. Dewnrb

    Dewnrb Just Hatched

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    Thanks so much! Yes - momma was a wild duck. I got a brief look at her - but it was quick. I am guessing that since most ducks hatch in 28 days - this one will too. However, I am somewhat nervous that if it goes longer, I will have quit turning the egg at 2 days and lowered the temp to 98 degrees.
    I have ordered the chick food already - will get the Brewers Yeast. I have a little water dish - but it is for birds and I think it will be more of a mess than it is worth. Will look for other ideas. I was going to put a towel down in the beginning - I read where that is good to help support their legs and not slip. I have not bought any wood chips or shavings yet. Will look for the assist hatch that you mentioned to see what I am in for. Thanks again!
     

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