Hello everyone molting questions

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by caroline11, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. caroline11

    caroline11 Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Mar 3, 2014
    SW Washington
    Hi I have 8 girls
    2 buff orpingtons
    2 black astralorps
    2 speckled sussex
    2 silver laced wyandottes

    They are about 1 year old and I have been getting lots of wonderful eggs. Around xmas time I noticed Lucy one of the black aus. started losing back feather soon she had a bare back and still does?? Now some of the others are losing some feathers. Miss Prissy a silver also now has a bare back I see no evidence of anything wrong but the feathers just are not growing back. Is this a normal molt?? I have been supplementing with mealworms and black oil sunflower seeds in addition to their layer pellets and I am still getting eggs. Thanks [​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,723
    2,687
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Doesn't sound like a molt and the wrong time of year unless you're in the southern hemisphere.

    Check for lice or mites.
     
  3. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

    5,466
    995
    291
    Dec 25, 2012
    I 2nd ChickenCanoe's post. You stated that you had 8 girls but how many men and boys do you have in your flock?

    Oh BTW [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2014
  4. caroline11

    caroline11 Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Mar 3, 2014
    SW Washington
    I don't see any evidence of lice or mites their skin is normal colored and smooth. The skin end of the feathers around the area are clean and I don't see anything unusual Is there something specific I need to look for? Thanks
     
  5. caroline11

    caroline11 Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Mar 3, 2014
    SW Washington
    Oh sorry new here I don't have any boys just hens Thanks
     
  6. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

    32,123
    5,073
    601
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    [​IMG]

    Could they be plucking them out of each other? Birds that are in need of protein will eat their feathers or the feathers of the other birds. Aggression will cause them to pull each others feathers as well. Being cramped in can cause boredom and feather picking. Molting usually starts at the head of the bird. And you can see pin feathers coming in around the back of the neck.

    If they have a lot of bare patches, you can spray the areas with blu-kote to cover the bare skin so the birds don't bother each other and to help prevent infection.

    Good luck with your flock and enjoy BYC!
     
  7. caroline11

    caroline11 Out Of The Brooder

    16
    0
    22
    Mar 3, 2014
    SW Washington
    Well We have a large coop about 8x10 and the run is about 10x30 so I don't think they are cramped. They all seem to get along well I am always going out to see them, give treats, clean, and just enjoy watching. I do supplement with mealworms and sunflower seeds so I think they are getting enough protein. All the bare patches look like nice skin no redness or lesions. Is there something specific I should be looking for? Thanks
     
  8. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    65,195
    13,277
    786
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Welcome to BYC. If some of the hens are in pristine condition, they are probably feather plucking the others. Do a forum search on Pinless Peepers. They can be used to break this habit and allow your hens to regrow feathers.
     
  9. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

    83,463
    11,795
    816
    Aug 26, 2009
    Out to pasture
    You could buy chicken saddles for the bare backed ones and see if they start regrowing feathers.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

    36,684
    4,710
    566
    Feb 18, 2011
    Ohio
    Hello :frow and Welcome To BYC!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by