HELP Needed...My Rooster REPEATEDLY ATTACKED ME

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
8,120
16,870
706
USA
...have been workin with him each day. I used my cane just as a boundary buy only had to actually keep him at bay once in a week!... he's been doing 99% better!!! ... I'm gonna give him another chance and just keep working with him and not let grandkids in the run unless he is penned up.
I'm glad things are going better :)
That sounds like a good plan!
 

BigBlueHen53

We will get through this... together!
Premium Feather Member
Mar 5, 2019
19,785
74,092
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SE Missouri, USA
I don't think so, I know so. They didn't develope spurs for aesthetic reasons.

Yes, but to do this they need to be able to compete with other roosters.

Well that's my point. It may be the only thing you need a rooster for, especially if you keep them in a run, but I and many many others have, or have had, free range chiickens and a rooster needs to be able to defend his group from competeing males and while not often successful, predators.

Why not? Ime it doesn't take an awful lot of effort to come to a working arrangement with a rooster. My view, albeit unpopular is if you don't want to deal with rooster aggression then don't keep roosters.

I looked after free range chickens with multiple roosters who were human aggressive when I was ten. You learn to avoid them, much like you learn how to deal with any other potentially aggressive species.
The world iis a dangerous place and while chickens may be domesticated ime most are not tame. You have to work at making them trust you. It applies to hens as well as roosters.
I see your point, Shad.
 

dct10

Chirping
Aug 24, 2020
99
153
81
Lots of changes going on here today with my rooster's fav hen going broody. He has always let me pick him up and he has done the flirty dance sideways and everything with me the past 2 months. He is almost 8 months old. He is the only rooster to 2 hens all same age and raised together since day old.
He didn't just get me once...he repeatedly attacked me, got blood in several spots and everything. He's a bantam silkie! Never once done anything to anyone. Worst he has ever done is charge the hardware cloth to try to get to my son-in-law that is building larger coop OUTSIDE THE run.
He wouldn't quit attacking me even after doing the "V" hold several times til he relaxes. I fed him some corn like I always do then he just ran up as I was sitting down and luckily just got my arm not my face.
Please help! What on earth has happened to this dude?!!!
It's important to try to understand rooster psychology if you're going to have them. In all likelihood, you are provoking the attacks without realizing it. Remember, you are invading their domain. Life in their eyes was peaceful and calm until you entered. He perceives you as a threat, gets that shot of adrenaline and does what he's hardwired to do. When you pick the hens up, he thinks you are going to harm them. Those are his mates and his responsibility to protect and you are a threat. They're not those cute cuddly chicks anymore..they're adults and their primary drives center on survival and procreation. Some roosters are more alpha than others and they will fight other roosters to the death. They will never stop even when they're losing badly. They will also attack humans to the death and unfortunately, many have because the owner simply didn't understand how to deal with them. They are smart and sense fear and apprehension in people so be mindful of your own behaviors. I see it when my wife comes around the run. She exudes fear and Doc immediately picks up on it, capitalizes on it and runs her out. And he remembers how well it worked for future engagements. I completely disagree with those who say to pin a rooster down to the ground until they submit. Violence begets violence and breaking the spirit of any creature is immoral in my eyes. You may temporarily intimidate him but that won't last nor will it make him like or respect you. In fact, it won't work at all on most alpha roosters because they will just continue to come...ultimately hurting themselves. Believe it or not, roosters are proud and can feel embarrassed and humiliated, especially in front of the hens. Pinning him to the ground is undermining his place in the hierarchy. Although we arrogant humans find their aggressive behavior unacceptable, it's how they are supposed to behave and we are the ones disturbing nature. I find roosters courageous and noble. Men can learn some life lessons from them...but I digress. I have an 11 Lb Buff Cochin rooster (Doc)...he's a big boy and an alpha among alphas...he keeps the peace in the run and will protect his girls from any predator... and if necessary, lay down his own life to save theirs. I've seen it in action already. A falcon took a dive at the hens when they were free ranging one day. Doc was Johnny on the Spot. He is ever-vigilent and watchful over the hens and on that day, he didn't hesitate for an instant to go after the falcon and it got the hell outa there fast without hurting anyone. Solutions: Wear barn boots and work gloves when you're in the coop. Try offering snacks like raisins directly to him first...allow him to distribute them to his hens. Praise him verbally. Sounds weird, but I've seen Doc get all proud and happy when I say "good boy" to him. They are reactionary and you really can effect their mood and behavior. Minimize picking the hens up unless necessary. They probably don't like it anyway. When I sit and have my morning coffee, I allow them to come to me. Some hens will want to socialize and even jump onto your legs. This likely won't trigger the rooster. Eventually, he may even come over and decide you aren't so bad after all. And learn how to get control of him if you need to. There are times when they need medical checks, maintenance, cleaning etc so you need to know how to pick him up without drama. When mine used to attack me, I'd wave one hand in his face to distract him and grab him by the tail feathers with the other and turn him...then quickly pick him up and hold him for a while. If you get control of his legs, he actually feels more secure and will stop flailing. If he's also a pecker, let him peck your gloves until he learns it doesn't have any effect on you. I'd hold him firmly, talk calmly to him and pet him and he calms down. Once he relaxes, release him. The incident is usually over. He almost never takes a run at me anymore but will still go after anyone else who enters the run. Finally, you can also take a rotary tool or file and round off the points on his spurs. That's the only real means they have to hurt you and it will be good for a year or so. Good luck.
 

BigBlueHen53

We will get through this... together!
Premium Feather Member
Mar 5, 2019
19,785
74,092
1,217
SE Missouri, USA
Folks, a rooster's spurs are not his only weapon. When a rooster raked me from behind, completely unexpectedly, and I turned to face him, he then charged at me and got me just under the knee with his beak! He hit me so hard, it felt like a full-grown man had swung at me full force with the claw end of a hammer and nearly took me to the ground. I can only imagine what that beak could do to someone's face or eyes. As I staggered, he then launched himself at me, repeatedly, using wings, claws and beak, and yes, probably spurs as well. I used my cane to defend myself but he kept coming until my husband rescued me. I felt I was in a battle for my life. I'm a pretty tough old bird myself and could not believe a rooster could beat me up as badly as he did. But while he won that battle, he did not win the war. He never saw another sunrise. Since then my motto has been, Strike one, you're out.
 

HumbleAmerican

Songster
Nov 3, 2021
154
556
100
Folks, a rooster's spurs are not his only weapon. When a rooster raked me from behind, completely unexpectedly, and I turned to face him, he then charged at me and got me just under the knee with his beak! He hit me so hard, it felt like a full-grown man had swung at me full force with the claw end of a hammer and nearly took me to the ground. I can only imagine what that beak could do to someone's face or eyes. As I staggered, he then launched himself at me, repeatedly, using wings, claws and beak, and yes, probably spurs as well. I used my cane to defend myself but he kept coming until my husband rescued me. I felt I was in a battle for my life. I'm a pretty tough old bird myself and could not believe a rooster could beat me up as badly as he did. But while he won that battle, he did not win the war. He never saw another sunrise. Since then my motto has been, Strike one, you're out.
After that whipping..... dumplings never taste so good.
 

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