Help-not a super handy person...

llombardo

Crowing
Mar 11, 2018
3,015
4,781
346
Illinois
I got a 16x 25 ft run that is made with pvc and heavy duty netting. It's great for every season except winter--it did hold up last winter even with a large branch falling on it, but it sagged and wasnt safe--all chickens and ducks ended up in the house. The goal was to build a new coop in one area, but that didn't happen and now the area has changed where it will go. I started to put wood up on the inside if the pvc to cover the run. Originally it was going to have 5-6 inch pitch. Now where the new addition will be is next to the original run and a pitch is not going to work because of the width. If I pitch it, that mid point connecting the addition will hold lots of weight(snow)The new area will have the coop and two runs for the two boys and a seperate area for the girls to exit back to the original run. I was going to put hardware cloth on that roof. Corrugated panels on both areas. No matter what I would not be able to get the snow off.

Is it possible to get away with a flat roof everywhere? Should I only do corrugated in a few areas and leave the rest open with support? I'm doing every 2 feet for the long posts and 18 inches for purlins. My son is going to help me with the longer pieces because I just can't do it by myself(I tried)

The panels for the roof won't be added until spring. For now I'm trying to support the netting so it don't sag. The flat would probably work fine with just the netting or the hardware cloth that will be over the addition. It's the panels that concern me. What is the biggest area where flat would work? Should I just do flat with panels on the addition part and do flat without panels on the original. I would like it to be druer for them. Right now is super muddy-lots of rain today.

The only picture I have right now of the side area. It's where the coop will be. Where the dog is wll be the back side of coop and where the runs will be for the boys--each run will be 4x8 roughly. So the whole run(both areas together will be about 25 x25)
image.jpg
 

gtaus

Crowing
Mar 29, 2019
2,037
6,466
427
Northern Minnesota
My Coop
Did your top netting fill with snow, become heavy, and sag/collapse? I can see that happening with my bird netting which is why I will be taking down the top netting before the snow falls.

Your run is much bigger than mine. My run is 13X13 and I ran a rope from corner to corner to make a large "X". Then I put the bird netting on top of that rope support. If I had a bigger run like yours, I would have built a wooden tree/support in the middle of the run to support, and raise, the netting higher in the middle. That should help with the sagging.

I will be moving my coop to a winter location and plan on having a much smaller run. Most likely with a hard cover top and the sides of the run covered with plastic. It would not be very big, but I hope good enough for some fresh air and exercise. I would not do a flat roof where I live because of the snow load concerns - especially if you cannot remove the snow. If you have a partial roof and good supports underneath, anything is possible. But still, if you expect snow, a slanted roof would be better.

Maybe you could build a covered run within a larger open run. A smaller, partial covered roof with plastic on the sides would keep things dry for the birds. Then in the spring you could open up the small run and take advantage of the entire run. I don't know how strong PVC pipes are like on your run, but I would be concerned about them getting brittle and cracking under a heavy snow load.
 

llombardo

Crowing
Mar 11, 2018
3,015
4,781
346
Illinois
I have heard that the grey PVC used for electrical purposes holds up better in the sunlight and is less brittle than regular PVC. Don't know if this helps with the snow, but just going forward in the future... Nice looking German Sheppard by the way...
Thank you.

The PVC is actually pretty strong, holding well and solid. The snow here is hit or miss, last year it was a hit. With my luck it will be every year...lol
 

llombardo

Crowing
Mar 11, 2018
3,015
4,781
346
Illinois
Did your top netting fill with snow, become heavy, and sag/collapse? I can see that happening with my bird netting which is why I will be taking down the top netting before the snow falls.

Your run is much bigger than mine. My run is 13X13 and I ran a rope from corner to corner to make a large "X". Then I put the bird netting on top of that rope support. If I had a bigger run like yours, I would have built a wooden tree/support in the middle of the run to support, and raise, the netting higher in the middle. That should help with the sagging.

I will be moving my coop to a winter location and plan on having a much smaller run. Most likely with a hard cover top and the sides of the run covered with plastic. It would not be very big, but I hope good enough for some fresh air and exercise. I would not do a flat roof where I live because of the snow load concerns - especially if you cannot remove the snow. If you have a partial roof and good supports underneath, anything is possible. But still, if you expect snow, a slanted roof would be better.

Maybe you could build a covered run within a larger open run. A smaller, partial covered roof with plastic on the sides would keep things dry for the birds. Then in the spring you could open up the small run and take advantage of the entire run. I don't know how strong PVC pipes are like on your run, but I would be concerned about them getting brittle and cracking under a heavy snow load.
The only problem with this is the ducks which are in the half where the dog is. I will technically have 4 runs all connected. I'm not as worried about the ducks getting wet as I am the chickens. I also have rabbits out there. I Would like the ducks to have a small area where they can get out of the snow but be in the run and safely. They do not go in the house or use the winter shelter I built out of pallets(the rabbits did use it)

In the summer the pool goes in and in the winter the pool is loaded with straw for them

Winter shelter
image.jpg


Tree that fell on run last winter
image.jpg




View of net while inside run looking up
image.jpg
 

llombardo

Crowing
Mar 11, 2018
3,015
4,781
346
Illinois
I have heard that the grey PVC used for electrical purposes holds up better in the sunlight and is less brittle than regular PVC. Don't know if this helps with the snow, but just going forward in the future... Nice looking German Sheppard by the way...
Oh she is the watcher, but my other GSD is in and out all night keeping raccoons and Opposums away

image.jpg
 

llombardo

Crowing
Mar 11, 2018
3,015
4,781
346
Illinois
Did your top netting fill with snow, become heavy, and sag/collapse? I can see that happening with my bird netting which is why I will be taking down the top netting before the snow falls.

Your run is much bigger than mine. My run is 13X13 and I ran a rope from corner to corner to make a large "X". Then I put the bird netting on top of that rope support. If I had a bigger run like yours, I would have built a wooden tree/support in the middle of the run to support, and raise, the netting higher in the middle. That should help with the sagging.

I will be moving my coop to a winter location and plan on having a much smaller run. Most likely with a hard cover top and the sides of the run covered with plastic. It would not be very big, but I hope good enough for some fresh air and exercise. I would not do a flat roof where I live because of the snow load concerns - especially if you cannot remove the snow. If you have a partial roof and good supports underneath, anything is possible. But still, if you expect snow, a slanted roof would be better.

Maybe you could build a covered run within a larger open run. A smaller, partial covered roof with plastic on the sides would keep things dry for the birds. Then in the spring you could open up the small run and take advantage of the entire run. I don't know how strong PVC pipes are like on your run, but I would be concerned about them getting brittle and cracking under a heavy snow load.
This is kinda how it would be with the addition. The addition part will be about 10 by 25 with 8x12 of that the coop the back end will be 8x8 divided in half, but only leaves about 10 feet in the front part(10x8) and there are 13 girls. Don't think that will be enough, unless some stay put in the coop when it's super cold. I have to leave at least two feet on the one side to get to the gate that will be on the back side for the boys.
 

sorce

Songster
Aug 26, 2019
170
378
146
I'd switch out those 90's for 45's if you can and pitch the whole roof.
Capture+_2019-09-23-06-13-50.png


Or just create an independent structure inside it, a few fence posts and a roof, doesn't have to cover the whole thing, just enough to keep the center up and the sides pitched a bit.

Sorce
 

Mybackyardpeepers

Free Ranging
Mar 22, 2019
2,745
9,085
507
Michigan
Good morning. I am in a sorta similar situation, I just had a huge coop and run built. I am wanting to cover the back half of the run behind the coop, but it is wide and deep.
IMG_20190905_200950605.jpg

Best of luck!!!
 

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