help- quail processing

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by f5mtadas, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. f5mtadas

    f5mtadas Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 12, 2010
    I still want to raise quail for meat but since I haven't found anyone to do it for me I want to be sure I can butcher them before I go nuts buying cute little cortunix eggs next month. So with a dozen extra buttons in the house I have decided to turn a couple into dog food as practice.

    First I need some already sharp scissors/game bird shears that will definitely cut through a quail neck with one hand. I'm not sure I trust picking up whatever at walmart and I found my really sharp titanium scissors that I sliced my hand open on weren't that sharp when I was trying to dub Dameru's frostbit comb with them. I'm not sure if those would do it... If I mess up and it doesn't die right away it will probably be the end of my meat bird raising.... Links to any definitely good game bird shears?

    2nd where do you cut? Anywhere between the head and shoulders?

    3rd I doubt they make button size cones and I can't imagine the difficult wrapping a button in a plastic bag. I was thinking of just using 2 strips of duct tape. Tape it's legs together and then wrap a piece real quick around the wings so I can easily hold it with one hand without the risk of a button quail rocket. Those buggers can shoot pretty darn far when they get a wing loose or their legs against your hand. The last one I lost hold of bounced off the ceiling and then the wall on the other side of my house.

    last someone give me the nerves to cut the head off cute little pretty colored quail..... Oh and don't tell any of the people I'm selling cute little quail to as pets or that vegetarian animal rescue forum I occasionally hang out on... and certainly not my mom either... She'd probably send me to a psychiatrist if she knew I killed one of my birds myself... I don't come from a family of hunters. Someone else does the killing and we just get the meat. I want to change that and be more self sufficient.
     

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