Help! What are these spots?

duckiemum

Crowing
Sep 30, 2020
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You do not have to take any measure to help. It is fine just to let it run its course. Applying ointment to the pox can help it heal faster, or giving ACV or electrolytes can help boost the birds.
 

Isaac 0

Enabler
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Jul 19, 2016
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Thanks for all the help everyone! I guess what I’m asking is this, if I leave it untreated and just keep an eye on the chickens to make sure it isn’t causing them to not eat or get weak, is that OK? Or do I need to actively take some sort of measure to help.
Sometimes the scabs can spread around the eyes, and mouth, which can cause ocular damage to the eye, and cause the scabs to start forming in the mouth (known as the diphtheritic form of fowl pox). This can ultimately prevent the bird from properly eating, drinking, and breathing, and sometimes/often can result in death.

So in regards to whether to just leave it, or take a few precautions to help prevent the virus from getting too bad, I would have to go with the latter option. I think the saying "one ounce of prevention, is worth a pound of cure" works well in this case. Vaccinating all of the birds, cleaning their feeder's/waterer's, reducing mosquito populations, increasing ventilation withing the coop, applying iodine or ointment to the affected bird, and separating the affected birds as needed would be some of the precautions I would take.
 

Jgrice

Chirping
Apr 4, 2020
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Denton, TX
So I just noticed tonight, that one of my pullets has the fowl pox around it’s eyes and the eyes are nearly swollen shut. It’s an Easter Egger so she has a pretty thick beard of feathers around her eyes already. Any advice on a remedy for this?
 

Isaac 0

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Jul 19, 2016
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So I just noticed tonight, that one of my pullets has the fowl pox around it’s eyes and the eyes are nearly swollen shut. It’s an Easter Egger so she has a pretty thick beard of feathers around her eyes already. Any advice on a remedy for this?
Could you post some pictures of the area?

Sadly, other than what's been suggested in this thread, there isn't much else you can do. The scabs are highly contagious so avoid touching them too much, but if it's around her eyes, I would apply an antibacterial ointment rather than the Iodine, as the Iodine can be an irritant to the eyes sometimes.
 

Jgrice

Chirping
Apr 4, 2020
61
27
56
Denton, TX
Could you post some pictures of the area?

Sadly, other than what's been suggested in this thread, there isn't much else you can do. The scabs are highly contagious so avoid touching them too much, but if it's around her eyes, I would apply an antibacterial ointment rather than the Iodine, as the Iodine can irritate the eyes.
What kind of ointment do you recommend?
 

Jgrice

Chirping
Apr 4, 2020
61
27
56
Denton, TX
Neosporin, Preparation H, or Silver sulfadiazine cream will suffice.
Okay great, thank you. I’ll post some pictures. Ideally, if I do the other things you mentions, and if I apply this ointment and let the pox run it’s course, she should be okay? I just have never dealt with this and want to know how aggressive I need to handle it. I like the chicken specifically, a lot, and I hope I don’t lose her!
 

Isaac 0

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Jul 19, 2016
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Okay great, thank you. I’ll post some pictures. Ideally, if I do the other things you mentions, and if I apply this ointment and let the pox run it’s course, she should be okay? I just have never dealt with this and want to know how aggressive I need to handle it. I like the chicken specifically, a lot, and I hope I don’t lose her!
Generally, the mortality rate of birds affected with the dry form of fowl pox is low only around, one to five percent % according to this source. The wet form, which affects the inside of their mouth, is more severe.

http://extension.msstate.edu/publications/fowl-pox-backyard-flocks
 

Jgrice

Chirping
Apr 4, 2020
61
27
56
Denton, TX
Generally, the mortality rate of birds affected with the dry form of fowl pox is low only around, one to five percent % according to this source. The wet form, which affects the inside of their mouth, is more severe.

http://extension.msstate.edu/publications/fowl-pox-backyard-flocks
Here are some pictures. The right eye was able to open fully, but the other (in the second picture) is totally shut. I applied the ointment. I checked inside her mouth, and there is no wet form of the pox, so that’s good. I know it’s hard to tell from the pictures, she was trying to sleep.

Thank you so much for all the help. She is about 4-5 months old, not laying yet.
 

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Isaac 0

Enabler
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Jul 19, 2016
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Here are some pictures. The right eye was able to open fully, but the other (in the first picture) is totally shut. I applied the ointment. I checked inside her mouth, and there is no wet form of the pox, so that’s good.
Thank you so much for all the help. She is about 4-5 months old, not laying yet.
A little hard to see her eyes since she is sleeping, and, of course, the fluff. You could post some pictures when she's awake, and in good lighting at some point, if you'd like.
 

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