Help what is this?!

azygous

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Unfortunately, that mass of oviduct pus, "lash egg" being a cruel misnomer, signifies an advanced reproductive infection. When I've had hens produce this pus, they've been behaving normally. That's the cruel part. There is no early warning so that we can start the hen on an antibiotic and have a reasonable chance of recovery.

I'm sad to have to say that it's been my experience that when you see the pus being expelled, death won't be far behind, weeks rather than months.
 

HENS-and-MARES

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Unfortunately, that mass of oviduct pus, "lash egg" being a cruel misnomer, signifies an advanced reproductive infection. When I've had hens produce this pus, they've been behaving normally. That's the cruel part. There is no early warning so that we can start the hen on an antibiotic and have a reasonable chance of recovery.

I'm sad to have to say that it's been my experience that when you see the pus being expelled, death won't be far behind, weeks rather than months.
Do that usually lay it again? What are some ways to identify who layed it?
 

Eggcessive

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Apr 3, 2011
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Many times your hens can have lash egg material inside their abdomens, and be walking around looking just fine. When my hens die, I usually do a necropsy (autopsy) to look at their abdominal organs. Salpingitis or inflammation of the oviduct is the cause of lash egg material. Certain bacteria such as e.coli, mycoplasma gallisepticum, and others can get into the oviduct from the blood, the abdomen, or up from the vent to cause this inflammation. Antibiotics such as amoxicillin or the banned for poultry, enrofloxacin (Baytril) can be used to treat salpingitis in early stages, or to help extend life. I have never seen a lash egg that was laid, but plenty during a necropsy. Here is some reading about salpingitis:
https://www.thepoultrysite.com/disease-guide/salpingitis

https://the-chicken-chick.com/salpingitis-lash-eggs-in-backyard/
 

azygous

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Dec 11, 2009
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Once a hen starts expelling this lash material, their laying days are long over with. As I pointed out, you likely won't see symptoms until the hen is getting close to dying from the infection. Even if you knew which one it is, it's likely too late for an antibiotic to make a difference.

The last hen I had with salpingitis was eight years old, and she behaved normally up until a couple weeks before she died in her sleep. She had quit laying the year before.

Do you know that every one of your hens is laying?
 

HENS-and-MARES

Crowing
Apr 6, 2020
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Where it snows.
Once a hen starts expelling this lash material, their laying days are long over with. As I pointed out, you likely won't see symptoms until the hen is getting close to dying from the infection. Even if you knew which one it is, it's likely too late for an antibiotic to make a difference.

The last hen I had with salpingitis was eight years old, and she behaved normally up until a couple weeks before she died in her sleep. She had quit laying the year before.

Do you know that every one of your hens is laying?
No, the older ones have slowed down except for one.
 

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