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RojoMarz

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May 21, 2020
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Then what should I do?
People have already offered their thoughts.

1. Do nothing. Things will likely not go well when the cocks get older.

2. Make a bachelor pad setting and rehome the hen.

3. Make a hen pad and rehome the boys.

4. Rehome one boy and keep the pullet and a cock.

Ultimately you will need to decide. We can't make the decision for you.
 
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Marshmallow1234

In the Brooder
Oct 25, 2020
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There is no easy answer to this. Some will fight to the death in their first fight. Others....if there is enough room will fight and then avoid each other until they get to close then they fight again.

Roosters fighting is horrible. They rip each other up causing a lot of injury and blood.
Sometimes one will "win" and while the other still lives he is so injured it would be best to kill him rather than let him suffer then die.

Is that something you can do if it is needed?

Just so you know I speak from experience.....

Many years ago I bought 5 white silkies. They all turned out to be males.
Even though they were just 4 months old they were acting up. I did not separate them in time. They ganged up on my tiny Japanese black tail rooster. They tore his comb off, pecked his eye out, broke his toes, and stripped all the feathers off his tail. When I got home from work that day it was quite a horrible thing to see. Poor Bill was still alive. My Jersey Giant hen was standing guard. She was my top bird. Bill lived but it was a looooong road to recovery and I probably should have ended it.
The silkies.....they did not get to live with the flock. I had to cage them until I could get rid of them.
Should I serperate the hen and the roosters?
 

LadiesAndJane

Don’t look back, you’re not going that way.
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May 5, 2020
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Seems to me after reading this whole thread that you’re not getting the answers that you want to hear. :) You need to do what you feel is best in your situation. If you can only have three chickens, then you need to decide whether you want to have all boys or all girls. And then act accordingly based on your decision. Very good advice given to you and I know it’s tough to part with pets, but you need to do what’s best for your birds as well. If you keep things as they are, it will likely not end well for one or more of your birds. Good luck in making the choice that you need to make. Wishing you the best in making this tough decision.😊
 

bobbi-j

Crossing the Road
Mar 15, 2010
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On the MN prairie.
Seems to me after reading this whole thread that you’re not getting the answers that you want to hear. :) You need to do what you feel is best in your situation. If you can only have three chickens, then you need to decide whether you want to have all boys or all girls. And then act accordingly based on your decision. Very good advice given to you and I know it’s tough to part with pets, but you need to do what’s best for your birds as well. If you keep things as they are, it will likely not end well for one or more of your birds. Good luck in making the choice that you need to make. Wishing you the best in making this tough decision.😊
Agreed. No matter how many times or ways you ask, the answers from those with experience will be the same. This is not going to be a good situation for your pullet, and likely not for your cockerels. They will come to sexual maturity and be ready to mate before she is. They will spend most of every day chasing her, fighting to mate with her, knocking each other off of her to mate her, keeping her from eating, drinking, dust bathing and resting. She will be miserable, run ragged and could die. So who’s best interest do you have in mind here? That of your hen who will likely physically suffer, or yours? Yes, it’s hard to give up pets. For me, it’s even harder to watch them needlessly suffer. When we have pets, it’s our responsibility to give them the best quality of life possible. Even if that means that life is not with us.

Since you have already said your coop is not large enough to add more chickens (which isn’t always the best answer either and can cause more problems than it solves), I would recommend rehoming the boys and getting two more girls. Hens make better pets than cockerels anyway. An adult rooster will sometimes get human aggressive and that can be a dangerous situation. Especially if there are small kids who live at or visit your home.
 

21hens-incharge

Nuttier than a squirrels stash
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Mar 9, 2014
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Agreed. No matter how many times or ways you ask, the answers from those with experience will be the same. This is not going to be a good situation for your pullet, and likely not for your cockerels. They will come to sexual maturity and be ready to mate before she is. They will spend most of every day chasing her, fighting to mate with her, knocking each other off of her to mate her, keeping her from eating, drinking, dust bathing and resting. She will be miserable, run ragged and could die. So who’s best interest do you have in mind here? That of your hen who will likely physically suffer, or yours? Yes, it’s hard to give up pets. For me, it’s even harder to watch them needlessly suffer. When we have pets, it’s our responsibility to give them the best quality of life possible. Even if that means that life is not with us.

Since you have already said your coop is not large enough to add more chickens (which isn’t always the best answer either and can cause more problems than it solves), I would recommend rehoming the boys and getting two more girls. Hens make better pets than cockerels anyway. An adult rooster will sometimes get human aggressive and that can be a dangerous situation. Especially if there are small kids who live at or visit your home.
I agree 100%.

In my post about my silkie cockerels atracking my tiny rooster....I forgot to post my flock size at that time.
When that attack happened I had 36 large breed hens 1 tiny rooster and 4 bantam hens. That means there were 46 birds including those cockerels.
Having lots of females in no way guarantees a fight won't happen.

Little Bill paid a high price for me not intervening early.
 

Marshmallow1234

In the Brooder
Oct 25, 2020
84
45
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Agreed. No matter how many times or ways you ask, the answers from those with experience will be the same. This is not going to be a good situation for your pullet, and likely not for your cockerels. They will come to sexual maturity and be ready to mate before she is. They will spend most of every day chasing her, fighting to mate with her, knocking each other off of her to mate her, keeping her from eating, drinking, dust bathing and resting. She will be miserable, run ragged and could die. So who’s best interest do you have in mind here? That of your hen who will likely physically suffer, or yours? Yes, it’s hard to give up pets. For me, it’s even harder to watch them needlessly suffer. When we have pets, it’s our responsibility to give them the best quality of life possible. Even if that means that life is not with us.

Since you have already said your coop is not large enough to add more chickens (which isn’t always the best answer either and can cause more problems than it solves), I would recommend rehoming the boys and getting two more girls. Hens make better pets than cockerels anyway. An adult rooster will sometimes get human aggressive and that can be a dangerous situation. Especially if there are small kids who live at or visit your home.
Thanks, do I have to get full grown hens or just chicks?
 

Marshmallow1234

In the Brooder
Oct 25, 2020
84
45
37
Seems to me after reading this whole thread that you’re not getting the answers that you want to hear. :) You need to do what you feel is best in your situation. If you can only have three chickens, then you need to decide whether you want to have all boys or all girls. And then act accordingly based on your decision. Very good advice given to you and I know it’s tough to part with pets, but you need to do what’s best for your birds as well. If you keep things as they are, it will likely not end well for one or more of your birds. Good luck in making the choice that you need to make. Wishing you the best in making this tough decision.😊
Would it work if I keep one rooster and two hens?
 

bobbi-j

Crossing the Road
Mar 15, 2010
14,985
29,390
982
On the MN prairie.
Thanks, do I have to get full grown hens or just chicks?
I wouldn’t get baby chicks unless you have a way to separate them from your pullet until they’re old enough to integrate with your pullet. By getting babies, you also run the risk of getting more males. Integration might be tricky anyway since you don’t have much space. It would be ideal if you could get pullets at least a couple of months old.
 

Marshmallow1234

In the Brooder
Oct 25, 2020
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45
37
It would be better, but an all female flock would be better for pets. Sometimes a rooster will try to keep hens away from their human keeper because he thinks he needs to protect them. The hens will be more dependent on him than on you.
oh well, we took care of the roosters since they were just hatched and we gave them a lot of food and mealworms and they would also follow me around I love the roosters a lot and I still not sure...
 
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