Hen bleeding from comb...need some input

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jerseygirl1, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,497
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    Jun 20, 2009
    Orange County, NY
    OK, first I noticed this morning when changing bedding in nest box some blood around the edges. Since I know which hens out of 20 use it, I narrowed it down to about 4 of them. As they were all free ranging, I tried to see which one waqs bleeding and frm where. My white leghorn is bleeding from around her comb and ear section. This is a brand new flock (my first) and I highly doubt it's mites or lice, since I dust those nest boxes religously every Saturday. I'm thinking my little banty rooster is trying to do the bump and grind with her? That itself would be a feat. He's a Belgian Quail. Unless, her and another hen are fighting over the nest box.

    1) What type of bird , age and weight. - White leghorn hen, 6 months old, average weight
    2) What is the behavior, exactly. No behavior, just bleeding maybe from comb, which is LARGE for a leghorn
    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms? Just today that I notcied
    4) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma. Blood it seems from comb or maybe her ear area
    5) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation. I didn't see anything, jsut blood in nest box
    6) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all. Everything is OK so far
    7) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc. So far, OK
    8) What has been the treatment you have administered so far?None
    9 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet? I was going to wait til she roosts tonight, and isolate her to a large dog crate within the coop. She's very flighty, as is a leghorn from what I've read
    10) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.
    11) Describe the housing/bedding in use - Wood shavings, deep litter

    I would appreciate some advice, since I am so new at this and I would hate to lose one to my own inexperience.
    Thanks all
     
  2. CityClucks

    CityClucks The Center of a 50 Mile Radius

    Jan 31, 2009
    Tulsa, OK
    Hey jerseygirl - how is your hen doing? If you can, stop the bleeding with flour or baking soda if that's all you have on hand. I'd separate her for awhile just in case so others don't peck her wound. It sounds like the roo or another hen got hold of her. Good job on describing the injury - and good luck!
     
  3. Chickenaddict

    Chickenaddict Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 19, 2008
    East Bethel MN
    Corn starch and flour work well to stop the bleeding as well. I'd clean up the blood so the others aren't drawn to it and start pecking at it making things worse and just keep a close eye on them to see whats really going on. Maybe you can find out if it is just one of the other hens, all of them, or the roo just learning to do the deed and hasn't figured out how to grab her neck not her comb. If it's just one of the other hens picking on her I would suggest seperating the agro hen for a few days so that when she joins the flock again she will have to find her spot in the pecking order and is more then likely to back off and leave the other hen alone. That worked with a few of my cochin hens.
     
  4. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 20, 2009
    Orange County, NY
    I'm not sure now, I think maybe one of the other hens is picking on her, since the weather turned, they haven't been free ranging as much and the leghorns seem to be very intolerant to confinement.
    They broke two windows in the coop trying to escape last week. Well, I seperated her in the dog cage and she's not liking it, but right now I can't figure out who was doing it to her.
     

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