Hen has changed the color eggs layed

1 acre willows

Songster
Jan 15, 2018
150
134
111
Montana
I have a white mutt hen, pretty sure, about 80-90%, before she went broody this winter she layed green eggs. When she went broody no more green eggs, we break her of that, story of why for another time, but a couple weeks later green eggs again. As of 3/1 green eggs stopped and now we're getting blue eggs. No new additions to flock, just caught her laying a blue egg at lunch today. Is this something I should be watching? Is this a sign of anything bad? Haven't changed feed recently started adding some grower finisher crumble over the winter to help with the molt and cause it was a good cold winter. I try and mix about 2/3 layer with 1/3 grower. I make my own suet and keep that hanging in the run and any veggie scraps I can get to them. Oh, and a 3 or 4 hand fulls of scratch in the morning or at lunch. Only thing that has changed is the weather has finally become nice enough i pulled up the tarps I had hanging on the run to cut the wind and snow so the run is getting as much sun as it ever received.
 

sylviethecochin

Free Ranging
Jun 14, 2017
5,499
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Central PA
That's a little weird.

I do know that chickens' eggs get paler as the laying cycle progresses. Since the brown coating that makes your blue eggs into green eggs is decreasing, the egg might become more blue(?) (That's all I got.)

I myself got two grey eggs today. I know that the hens that laid them actually lay green eggs, but there was an extra calcium coating that made them look grey.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
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Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
The pigment on the outside surface of an eggshell is produced from materials stored in a hens' body. The color of the exterior of the eggshell is only skin deep because not only is the interior of the shell white the eatable portion of the egg is segregated from the eggshell by a white membrane.
The storage of these materials are controlled by the hens' hormones. These materials wax and wane with the seasons and can and do result in lighter eggshell colors at the end of the yearly laying cycle than the colors that were present at the start of the laying season. So a change in feed or other husbandry issues can definitely bring on temporary changes in eggshell colors.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
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The pigment on the outside surface of an eggshell is produced from materials stored in a hens' body. The color of the exterior of the eggshell is only skin deep because not only is the interior of the shell white the eatable portion of the egg is segregated from the eggshell by a white membrane.
The storage of these materials are controlled by the hens' hormones. These materials wax and wane with the seasons and can and do result in lighter eggshell colors at the end of the yearly laying cycle than the colors that were present at the start of the laying season. So a change in feed or other husbandry issues can definitely bring on temporary changes in eggshell colors.
This is true of brown eggs and, therefore, green but blue egg shells are blue throughout.... this van be seen by examining the inside of a cracked egg...the membrane, once dry, makes it apear white, but when peeled away reveals blue shell interior.
 

RWise

Songster
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
1,270
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Oakhurst Oklahoma
My EEs certainly make coloured shells, lighter on the inside than the outside. One girl lays a,, what I call brown egg with purple hue,,, others have said "that's the pinkest egg~", but it is brown on the inside.
 

igorsMistress

Frank and Abbys mom.
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Apr 9, 2013
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My ee girl lays green eggs. They're blue inside though, and I noticed that as she went into a molt that the color was less green, but all back to normal now. Just give her some time and the color will come back.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
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My EEs certainly make coloured shells, lighter on the inside than the outside. One girl lays a,, what I call brown egg with purple hue,,, others have said "that's the pinkest egg~", but it is brown on the inside
Brown eggs are white on the inside....
....the pinkish hue is caused by the bloom over the brown coating.
 

RWise

Songster
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
1,270
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216
Oakhurst Oklahoma
Sorry to bust your bubble here, but My girls (the brown egg layers) eggs are brown on the inside, 'cept for one girl that her egg is white inside, as you describe.
And the "pinkish hue" is purple! And certainly a coating.
I dont really fell the need to pull out the camera,,,,
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
15,055
821
Oregon
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Sorry to bust your bubble here, but My girls (the brown egg layers) eggs are brown on the inside, 'cept for one girl that her egg is white inside, as you describe.
And the "pinkish hue" is purple! And certainly a coating.
I dont really fell the need to pull out the camera,,,,
You have some special birds then as the science behind how and when different pigments are applied is pretty well established.

This, for example comes from Michigan State:
All eggs start out white in color; those that are laid in shades other than white have pigments deposited on them as the eggs travel through the hen’s oviduct. The journey through the chicken’s oviduct takes approximately 26 hours. The shell takes roughly 20 hour to be complete. Ameraucana birds have the pigment oocyanin deposited on the egg as it travels through the oviduct. This pigment permeates the egg shell resulting in the interior and exterior of the egg being the same blue color. Chickens that lay brown tinted eggs deposit the pigment protoporphyrin on the eggs late in the process of forming the shell. The pigment therefore does not penetrate the interior of the egg, but tints only the surface of the egg, which is why brown eggs are white on the interior. In the case of an Olive Egger, a brown pigment overlays a blue egg shell resulting in a green egg. The darker the brown pigment the more olive color of the resulting egg.
 

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