Horse Question!! Please Answer!!!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Emma909, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. Emma909

    Emma909 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 4, 2011
    We have a horse that is deathly allergic to tranquilizer and he needs to get his hocks injected. There is one solution to bring him to the hospital and give him anesthesia and then do his hocks. Is there another way? Is there anyway we can help his hocks at this moment before we take him to the hospital?
     
  2. lockedhearts

    lockedhearts It's All About Chicken Math

    Apr 29, 2007
    Georgia
    It depends on exactly what is wrong with them and what his exercise level is. I would discuss this with the vet, as far as alternative and/or support treatments.
    I have a supplement I use for a variety of issues, it is mineral based but I consult my vet first and the person that created the supplement second before giving it.

    It also depends what type of sedative this horse has problems with, there is more than one on the market for horses.
     
  3. Redcatcher

    Redcatcher Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2010
    At My Desk!
    Twitching (if done correctly) works very well on some horses in place of a tranquilizer. I think it would be worth a try.
     
  4. elevan

    elevan Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    Quote:x2

    Just google horse twitch for more info
     
  5. myhubbycallsmechickeemama

    myhubbycallsmechickeemama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 9, 2011
    Arco, ID
    Quote:x2

    Just google horse twitch for more info

    X3
     
  6. hvnsnt3388

    hvnsnt3388 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 9, 2011
    Twitching is probably the best option for you. I adopted 2 wild stallions that were up to be gelded. Neither had ever had any hands (other than mine during a gentling process) on them. They both had to be twitched JUST to get there tranqualizer for the surgery.
     
  7. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    Twitching isn't a real good option during hock injections.

    I don't see how your horse could be allergic to all tranquilizers. For example, allergic reactions to Acepromazine are very rare.

    There are a lot of different tranquilizers available out there, I'm sure there's one he won't react to.

    There are also several other classes of drugs that can be used, that cause them to hold still, but aren't tranquilizers, like Rompun.

    What tranquilizer was he given and how did he react to it? Hives, throat/breathing problems?

    If the horse is having periodic hock injections, that sounds like he has some arthritis ('spavin') in his hocks. He could get a vacation from work for a while, til he gets his injection, or he could be given an anti-inflammatory medication; your vet is the best person to answer those questions as he knows the horse's history.

    By the way, guys, if your horses are having any hives due to environmental allergies, you might ask your vet about using Claritin. Some people round here are trying it and having good luck. It's inexpensive and seems to be effective, but do please discuss it with your veterinarian - don't give your horse any meds, supplements or other treatments before discussing it with your vet....
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011
  8. babyblue

    babyblue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 23, 2009
    I think this would be a better thing to ask your vet, however...


    If it is arthritis as WC mentioned as a possibility what other treatments are being utilized? for my old gelding keeping the extra pounds off, consistent exercise and lots of turn out work wonders. I just had the vet out for his shots and yearly exam and was told that he looks stupendous for a 21yo guy.


    That being said my same horse reacts weirdly to some things, certain antibiotics can make him colicky, while some tranquilizers have to be used in huge doses to be effective. I wont even let them bother with Ace because they have to dose so heavy. I have also had vets in the past greatly under estimate his weight. Now at his thinnest in his life time he weighs in at 1200 pounds, when he was 8 and a full time show horse for all three of my sisters and I he was 1350 and yes the weight are very accurate because I used the livestock scale at the farm show building many times . Over dosing is just as bad as over dosing.
     

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