Hospital to ban odor of smoke on workers' clothes.

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by kuntrygirl, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Feb 20, 2008
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    This is a Louisiana hospital that is about 60 miles from where I live. I thought this was interesting. I'm curious to know if there are any other hospitals in other states that are implementing this same policy.

    I wonder how many of their employees will quit their jobs because of this policy.

    ALEXANDRIA — Christus St. Frances Cabrini Hospital in Alexandria will implement an anti-tobacco policy for its entire campus starting July 1 of next year, expanding the policy put in place two years ago for employees of the women's and children's areas.

    The Town Talk reports the policy will prohibit the use of tobacco products by employees while on their shifts, including when they are on breaks. It also will not allow employees to work if their clothing smells like smoke.

    "About a month or two ago we sent a letter to all of our associates to their homes," hospital administrator Lisa R. Lauve said. "We sent a letter notifying them that they had a year to make whatever adjustments they needed to make to be able to comply with the policy that would not allow them to smoke during the hours that they work."

    Hospital officials are aiming to reduce patients' and employees' exposure to toxins that linger in fabrics from a recently burned cigarette, also known as third-hand smoke, Lauve said. Such toxins present a special danger for the developing brains of infants and small children.

    Ideally, Cabrini policymakers would like to see all employees quit tobacco products for good, Lauve said. And the hospital will offer those wanting to quit tools, support and resources available to help them kick the habit.

    "Optimally, we would love to help our associates stop smoking for their own health," Lauve said. "We actually have a couple of primary-care physicians that are doing some work in their offices with smoking cessation."
    Clinical consultations, habit-focused programs and possibly prescriptions from physicians and practitioners are available to employees looking to drop the pack, Lauve said.

    Alternatives like nicotine patches, access and information from online resources and support groups are also examples of the tools that will be in place to keep employees tobacco-free.

    "We've actually contacted The Rapides Foundation," Lauve said. "We've contacted AHEC (Central Louisiana Area Health Education Center) and everywhere we can to get all resources we can provide to our associates."

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in Louisiana, accounting for about 6,500 deaths in the state each year and $1.47 billion in annual direct health-care expenses, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control statistics compiled by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

    Tax burdens caused by smoking-related government expenditures on the state and national level cost about $644 per household in Louisiana annually.
    Those costs do not include health costs caused by exposure to secondhand smoke, smoking-caused fires, smokeless tobacco use or cigar and pipe smoking, according to Tobacco-Free Kids. One of the goals for announcing implementation of the new policy nearly a year in advance is to give employees the opportunity to pursue quitting options that work for them before the new ban, Lauve said.

    Though Cabrini employees complied with a 2006 city ordinance banning smoking within 50 feet of a health-care facility, satisfaction surveys conducted by the hospital have indicated the smell of cigarettes on an employee's clothing and person resonates poorly with patients, visitors and non-smoking employees, Lauve said. That's one of the factors that prompted administrators to put together and implement the new policy.

    "It's really a combination of push from our patients and from our associates who do not smoke and don't appreciate working "with the smoke smell," Lauve said.
    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in Louisiana, accounting for about 6,500 deaths in the state each year and $1.47 billion in annual direct health-care expenses, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control statistics compiled by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

    Tax burdens caused by smoking-related government expenditures on the state and national level cost about $644 per household in Louisiana annually.
    Those costs do not include health costs caused by exposure to secondhand smoke, smoking-caused fires, smokeless tobacco use or cigar and pipe smoking, according to Tobacco-Free Kids. One of the goals for announcing implementation of the new policy nearly a year in advance is to give employees the opportunity to pursue quitting options that work for them before the new ban, Lauve said.

    Though Cabrini employees complied with a 2006 city ordinance banning smoking within 50 feet of a health-care facility, satisfaction surveys conducted by the hospital have indicated the smell of cigarettes on an employee's clothing and person resonates poorly with patients, visitors and non-smoking employees, Lauve said. That's one of the factors that prompted administrators to put together and implement the new policy.

    "It's really a combination of push from our patients and from our associates who do not smoke and don't appreciate working "with the smoke smell," Lauve said.​
     
  2. cupman

    cupman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2011
    Portland, OR
    Good deal. When I was in elementary school these people would send their kid to school every day reeking of cigarette smoke and general filth to the point I couldn't even be near him. I don't blame the kid, I actually feel bad for him. He would have had such an easier time and had more friends if someone had just pulled his parents aside and told them to better monitor how their child's clothes were cleaned and stored so it wouldn't be a problem.
     
  3. Squishy

    Squishy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2011
    Florida
    OH Please... That going too far! <Says a non-smoker>

    People who have such a medical issue that the mere scent of the residue of smoke on someones clothing is a health problem for them... they need to wear a mask. If that scent is such an issue, there are a gazillion other spores and scents and perfumes out there that would be a health problem for them too.

    This is just interefering with peoples freedom here.


    I've been on the other side of this too..... as a kid in school having teachers accuse me of smoking and searching my stuff for cigarettes (futile!) just because I smelled like smoke... because members of my family smoked and it was on my clothes!

    How are those people going to keep their clothes smoke free? They might have family that smokes, friends that smoke, their car might smell like smoke from someone else, or they might be one of the many people who has to take a bus to work! That's just making an impossibe situation for some folks!

    Furthermore... what about winter time? Fire related smoke? Are we so sure those sniffers lying in wait for the employees when they come in the door, can tell the difference between different kinds of smoke??!! [​IMG]
     
  4. ladyride

    ladyride Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 30, 2011
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    Where I live all hospitals have instituted this change yeah a few may have quit their jobs but in todays economy more quit smoking. They had a choice loose your job or loose your income which do you need most ? I quit smoking needed my job.
     
  5. ChikeeMomma

    ChikeeMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 29, 2009
    Mid Michigan
    I don't care if people smoke, but I do see the point of not wanting healthcare professionals to smoke. Where do you draw the line on what someone does in his/her personal time? I really don't know!

    I will say that I was put off when I took my daughter into a new peditrician's office and the nurse smelled of smoke. She had just come from lunch and the smell was on her hands still even though she'd washed them. When you have a baby, you hear you shouldn't do this or that. Having a smoke smell even on your clothing is one of them. I guess it increases the risk of SIDS in infants. I guess that's why I felt weirded out by it. That office sees little babies all day long, some with breathing/heart problems. I don't know that it is good for that type of child, expecially, to be in contact with someone who has just smoked a cigarette. Especially, when the pediatrician is telling you to keep your baby/children away from that. I don't know, that's a hard one!
     
  6. JellyBeanCee

    JellyBeanCee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm ok with them banning it. There is nothing worse than having a nurse or doctor lean over you and having them reek of smoke, perfume or cologne while you already feel bad. Although, I wish some would ban coffee drinking as well, bad breath from coffee is just about as bad. Yergh. [​IMG]
     
  7. prairiehen74369

    prairiehen74369 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some kind of a constitutioal right is being violated here.......come on folks get a life and leave other folks and their business alone I burn wood for heat sooo......am I going to be refused admittance to your hospital????
     
  8. cupman

    cupman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2011
    Portland, OR
    Quote:No constitutional rights are being violated. It's their place of employment, they aren't forced to be there. It would be like shouting obscenities at your boss, getting fired, then complaining about freedom of speech.
     
  9. JellyBeanCee

    JellyBeanCee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Austin, TX
    The sad thing is there will never be a way to fully stop the smell from encroaching into the nasal passages of non smokers. I can be driving around in my car, enjoying the beautiful weather we're having, get stopped at a stoplight and someone in front of me is puffing away, the smoke blows into my car and ruins the scent of my nice early fall breeze. That person is smoking in their personal car, driving on a public road, nothing I can do about it, except roll up my windows...then I'm no longer able to enjoy the outdoor air. It will always be that way I guess....non-smokers say ban it...smokers say it violates their constitutional rights to smoke. No easy answer.
     
  10. ChikeeMomma

    ChikeeMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 29, 2009
    Mid Michigan
    Quote:Hehehe.......Yeah, coffee breathe is pretty bad!
     

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