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How do you avoid shrink wrapping chicks

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by TK Poultry, May 3, 2011.

  1. TK Poultry

    TK Poultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 25, 2009
    Greencastle, Indiana
    I do it every time!!! how do you avoid it. I want to try this dry hatch method that was suggested? I'm terrible at hatching..... [​IMG]
     
  2. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2009
    SouthEast Texas
    Well, it would probably help to know more about your methods, but one of the big keys to not shrink wrapping is to get your humidity steady for lock down and not opening that 'bator. Many times, opening the incubator is what causes the shrink wrap effect.

    I have used dry hatching many times successfully, but it's important to make sure your humidity during lockdown and hatch is high enough to prevent shrink wrap. I usually aim for about 55.
     
  3. TK Poultry

    TK Poultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 25, 2009
    Greencastle, Indiana
    well I hand turn my eggs, because I don't like using the egg turner. I use a pencil to write on the eggs not a marker because I read that was bad. I kept and usually keep my humidity between 30%-40% and usually have it at about 60% during lockdown. I put a sponge in there for the extra humidity. Could a loose glass thing on top be a cause?
     
  4. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2009
    SouthEast Texas
    From reading others' experiences, i know that different areas of the country, and altitude can play a big part in determining optimum humidity. If i were you, i think i would try keeping the humidity at about 50 percent during the incubation period and see if you have better results.

    If you have a loose lid, i would definitely expect that you could be losing humidity and heat. It might be a factor. It's hard to say.
     
  5. ScissorChick

    ScissorChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2010
    Under Your bed
    Do not open the incubator if you have any pips. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2011
  6. HaikuHeritageFarm

    HaikuHeritageFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2010
    Anchorage, AK
    I wish I had read this a few hours ago. [​IMG] I already lost one to shrink wrapping and I had another pip when I opened it up to see if I could help the one that hadn't made any progress.
     
  7. ScissorChick

    ScissorChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2010
    Under Your bed
    Quote:[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    It's important to avoid opening the incubator when chicks are hatching.

    We all make mistakes! [​IMG]
     
  8. jvls1942

    jvls1942 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2008
    wausau,wisconsin
    humidity varies all over the world. it shouldn't matter..
    what is going on inside the incubator is what matters..

    You are creating a minnie climate inside the incubator.. If you control the humidity inside the bator to hold 30% to 40% during incubation and raise it to 60% during hatch, you should have no shrink wraps..

    and do not open the hatcher if there are any pips.. between pips, you can sneak the chicks out..
     
  9. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2009
    SouthEast Texas
    Quote:Theoretically, i agree with you 100%, but experience has taught me differently. Even though i treat the humidity and temperatures exactly the same, i get poor hatches in the winter when our humidity is lower. And i've read similar tales from folks all over the country. For some reason i can't put my finger on, it does matter.
     
  10. jvls1942

    jvls1942 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2008
    wausau,wisconsin
    Quote:Theoretically, i agree with you 100%, but experience has taught me differently. Even though i treat the humidity and temperatures exactly the same, i get poor hatches in the winter when our humidity is lower. And i've read similar tales from folks all over the country. For some reason i can't put my finger on, it does matter.

    I have found that winter eggs and early early spring eggs just do not hatch as well.. I think it has to do with lower egg vitality due to the chickens trying to keep warm..

    I have an enclosed room in my basement that stays pretty constant year round.. I still have less success with winter eggs..
     

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