How do you teach a pup not to...

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by testrechupacabre, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. testrechupacabre

    testrechupacabre Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 23, 2010
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    today my new 7 wk old pup got in the chicken pen, at first it wasnt a big deal he was just sniffing them but then he grabbed one of my girls by the tail [​IMG] I yelled no and saved her right away, luckily she only had some slobber on her.
    I dont want to worry about this pup being outside especially when he get older and can do some REAL damage
    HOW can i teach my pup to be kind to my chickens? [​IMG]
     
  2. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My Coop
    spend time with him when he is around them. If he goes to make a bad move you stop it.
    Some dogs are bred with the instinct to go after birds, those sometimes can't be taught to leave them alone.

    Our Golden Retriever actually lets the chickens walk all over her
     
  3. Lifetime chicken lover

    Lifetime chicken lover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 26, 2009
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    I think obedience training and the command "leave it" is very important. My pup is still learning, but he used to go nuts everytime we passed the coop, now I say "leave it" and he just looks the other way. (and that's after only 3 weeks of obedience training)
    I agree with Mahonri, if you spend time with the dog near the chickens, all together, a dog will understand that the chickens are also "family" and also need the same protection as the rest of the family.
     
  4. cambriagardener

    cambriagardener Chillin' With My Peeps

    We are becoming "guardians" of a 16 week-old Australian Labradoodle this week. She will be bred twice, then become ours. I'm glad I found this tread as I've been worried about her going after the hens. They are not free range but still................................ I am interested to know how to teach a dog to ignore all its instincts and "leave it". I guess exposure on a leash is the best beginning. We'll see.
     
  5. Naughty

    Naughty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know my bichon frese (lil yapper type dog) learned the hard way not to mess with those feathered things - they chase you - and make lots of noise - and they peck you on the tush!

    He is allowed in the coop during the day while I'm at work - and so far - he just wants them to leave him alone - plus he likes to play in their wading pool...

    they like to peck at the straw in his house - so i figure it will be a dual benefit - keep stuff off of him too...
     
  6. mmaddie's mom

    mmaddie's mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:"Leave it" is a general command for anything you want your dog to leave alone for HIS own health and benefit... teach it with a lot of different things starting with a yummy treat that he really wants (yes, use a leash and a training collar)... it will translate to lots of stuff including CHICKENS. Everyone at my house MUST live in peace and harmony... they don't call me the Alpha B**** for nothing (please keep in mind that this is absolutely the right and proper term in a pack world, but editted for folks who prefer not to use the term). [​IMG]
     
  7. cjdmashley

    cjdmashley Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 29, 2010
    Vermont
    our 2 yr. old (5 lb.) yorkie killed one of our pullets when they were about 2 months old. sense they have gotten much bigger now she has taken well to helping wrangle them but she must be watched LIKE A HAWK we also have two pit/american bulldog mixes that are more scared when they flutter than the chickens are of them. Just like with anyone, breed and personality will be the deciding factor. no 2 kids, dogs, or chickens are the same! 7 weeks is a great time to start though, Best of luck!!!
     

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