How does a Poultry Auction work?

Discussion in 'Chickenstocks, Shows, Meet-Ups' started by Themartinfarm, May 21, 2010.

  1. Themartinfarm

    Themartinfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 8, 2009
    The Oregon Coast
    We have lots of Roosters (Bantam & Standard) I'm looking at taking to an Auction the first week of June. We also have Pheasants, a Mature Turkey & others I'm thinking about taking along.
    However, I have never been to on & don't know what to expect. I don't know how it works, nothing...
    I have heard that people can be very rough with the birds. I know I'd have a hard time if someone was mistreating any of the birds... Especially if I sold some of mine & seen people carrying them by the feet or something...
    Could you tell me how it works, what to expect, advice, ect?

    Thank You,
    Tori

    http://www.martinfarm.net
     
  2. Themartinfarm

    Themartinfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 8, 2009
    The Oregon Coast
    Any help would be great!
     
  3. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Elizabethtown, NC
    I only take mine to an auction if I have not sold them within 3 months of listing them for sale. Auctions can be rather rough on birds since most of them are very fast paced. The one I take mine to charges a 10-15% buyer AND seller fee for whatever you sell. So, if your rooster goes for $2, then they will take at least 20 cents away... you "make" $1.80. I've seen them carrying birds all different ways, mostly by the legs upside down. They scared my poor fellows to death since they had never been handled that way. Keep in mind that most roosters auctioned off are going into somebody's stew pot, so be mentally and emotionally prepared before you go. I wouldn't recommend buying anything unless a tester is present and actually testing the birds. Especially don't buy one that looks sick and puny, even if you feel sorry for it.

    Basically, you will register your birds and get your seller number so they can link your birds to you. You will have to provide your driver's license or so type of ID for verification. The staff will put your birds in order as they arrive and tag them with a number and something list what breed they are in the tag. When the auction starts, they will sell birds by the cage for one price or individually depending on the auctioneer or seller preference. People bid and the highest get the bird(s). Sometimes, but not always, if they don't go for what you want, you can call out "No Sale" and they go back. At the end of the auction, you go back to the office to collect your check and get your empty cages from the auction area. Be sure your cages are LABELED since they tend to walk away.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2010
  4. chick4chicks

    chick4chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 6, 2008
    N.E. Pa.
    I have been to auctions where the birds are handled decently and then others they grab them by the feet and carry them upside down. That is hard for me to watch, my birds are never treated like that. Good luck
     
  5. Themartinfarm

    Themartinfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 8, 2009
    The Oregon Coast
    Thank You so much for the info!
    We have Cuckoo Maran Roosters & Bantam Rooters (Silkie, Cochin, Frizzle, ect). They aren't selling...
    The Cuckoo Marans are very sweet & so are all of the bantams... I have a hard time with the idea of someone being rough with them. We are just soooo tight on space & so many roosters that aren't selling...
    The Auction are going to charges 30%, yikes! I may call around to see about other places...
    I dunno... My husband took the time off work to go with me. Now I'm starting to regret the decision...
     
  6. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Elizabethtown, NC
    Quote:Do you have a local flea market or feed store that will let you sit out in the parking lot to sell? That's another option.
     
  7. Themartinfarm

    Themartinfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 8, 2009
    The Oregon Coast
    We're in a small town, most of our customers come from 1 1/2 hours away...
    I'm so frustrated right now... I had someone just call & think my price for baby pheasants is to much. The guy wants them for nothing... If he had to pay our feed bill I'm sure he wouldn't be saying anything...
     
  8. High Roost Ranch

    High Roost Ranch The Chicken Whisperer

    Be prepared for the worst at the auction. I have never seen a poultry auction where the birds were handled with care. Although my local auction barn knows how I feel about them rough handling my birds and they tend to be a little nicer to them. I've always said I am going to start a livestock auction where the livestock are handled with care.

    You might consider craigslisting your excess birds. But as you say, people want everything for nothing. Deduct the time you spend hauling them to auction, the handling they are going to experience, the possible health issues you may end up bringing home from those you no-sale, and the commission fees you'll pay and you can adjust your price accordingly to sell locally. I have a very hard time seeing my birds go to meat buyers, so I usually plan ahead and auction off the excess males when they are too young to process, so they are less likely to go right to the processors. Yes, I make less but my conscience feels better with emptier pockets.

    Times are tough right now, especially where I'm at here in FL. People are giving poultry and other livestock away because they can't afford to keep them anymore. So when you price yours, you have to take that into consideration. And believe me, I am with you on what a person has into them to get them raised up. It's impossible to even hope to break even, forget about making a profit.
     
  9. dutchhollow

    dutchhollow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2008
    SW IA
    Call your autction house and ask, all the ones around there the birds have to sell with a cage, or on the weekly auction they have cages set up and the animals stay in them and the selling procedes around, the birds aren't taken out until the purchaser comes to get them. The bird sales in cages are easy, just put together some makeshift cages and they go with. At the reg. weekly auction roos bring about 7/8 dollars for lb, they are going straight to someones pot.
     
  10. AussieMama

    AussieMama Just Hatched

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    Feb 8, 2017
    In April, it will be the first time I have ever attended a poultry show, and possibly a poultry auction. I might be auctioning by Black Australorp cock (pictured in my avatar). I have no idea what to expect about buyers and their eye for birds, or have any idea of what to expect of judges looking for perfection of my Aussie, or how shows even work. This is my first time owning chickens and showing one.
    I don't really know if I'll be mentally okay about seeing my roo handled in such ways listed in this thread, because I have never handled my boys by their legs or made them stay in a small cage for so long. I don't know if I'll be mentally okay if buyers do buy my roo.
    Anything will help me out in navigating what to expect, thanks. [​IMG]
     

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