How fresh is my breakfast?

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by WildCHILD400, Jul 23, 2017.

  1. WildCHILD400

    WildCHILD400 Songster

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    i was just wondering how long are freshly layed chicken eggs are good for, how to store them, and how do I properly clean them?
     
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  2. Fanci Feathers Marans

    Fanci Feathers Marans Chicken Tender

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    Well, I have heard that, in the old country, eggs are not refrigerated at all. Something to do with Americans spraying them with pesticide.

    Mine sometimes stay on the counter in the air conditioning for three days before I put them in the fridge.

    One way to test is to float them in the sink. If they sink, it's a good egg. If one end is raised slightly, it's about a week old. If it floats, pitch it.

    Always sniff an eggs' contents before using.
     
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  3. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Crowing

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    Most of us collect daily, twice if on hot days, and place eggs in a cool area, though not necessarily the refrigerator. It is generally better to refrigerate as soon as gathering to keep the egg freshest and ensure the longest possible shelf life.

    To wash or not to wash. Well, there is actually a debate about that. It has a lot to do with how the eggs are handled after being laid and where they will be kept until use.

    In Europe, eggs are not refrigerated nor washed. Many countries, such as Britain, make it illegal for commercial growers to wash eggs sold to the public.

    In America, the FDA requires that commercial growers wash, sanitize, and refrigerate eggs.

    So what is the difference? The philosophy of commercial industry practices.

    Nature has provided the egg with an anti-bacterial bloom which prevents spoilage; otherwise, no hen would ever be able to slowly gather a clutch (usually 10 to 12 eggs...so over 10 to 12 days) then sit on it for 21 more days without having every egg rot.

    Washing the egg removes that protective bloom.

    That is why in Europe many countries forbid washing of eggs by commercial growers as it removes the natural barrier. It is also believed washing hides untidy commercial practices. Commercial growers have to keep clean nests (ideal) to have presentable eggs (ideal).

    In America, with our typical industrial line processing, the commercial farmers find it much easier to streamline everything including large flocks and cage raised hens. Eggs can get soiled, so it is easier to wash and sanitize the eggs. That then requires them to be refrigerated as the protective bloom has been removed.

    An unwashed, bloom intact egg, can be kept at room temperature for about 7 weeks of age before showing deterioration. An egg, washed or unwashed, can be kept in the refrigerator for about 7 months before showing deterioration.

    It is interesting to note that I have had to wash badly soiled breeder eggs before placing under a hen, and they still produced fine chicks with no discernible difference between the unwashed eggs....and that's sitting underneath the warm backside of a hardly sanitized hen for 21 days.

    I'll link an interesting article for you from the Mother Earth News that looks into how to best store eggs below.

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/how-to-store-fresh-eggs-zmaz77ndzgoe

    LofMc
     
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  4. WildCHILD400

    WildCHILD400 Songster

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    Thanks for all the tips and tricks learned lots of new things thx for the article attachment
     
    Lady of McCamley likes this.

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