How many hens can I have without a rooster?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Camille13, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. Camille13

    Camille13 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 1, 2009
    I am just curious if anyone has any experience with a larger flock without a rooster. I have 7 full grown laying hens, one broody that is taking care of 4 chicks(I am pretty sure one is a rooster already, due to comb development), and 4 7 week old chicks. I don't think we can have roosters where we live, and I don't want to get woken up by one. My kids already do that!
    Right now I have the 4, 7 week old chicks in their own coop, and want to move the coop within the run (it is a big run, technically big enough for 30 chickens) but don't know if this will bring chaos to a calm crowd. The mama and babies all get along, thanks to the good mama. No one pecks anyone's feathers, and they are currently happy and beautiful. Should I not mess with a good thing? The coop in the run is technically big enough for 14 birds, but I never planned on more than 10. Just thought they would like the room.
     
  2. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    You can have a flock of HUNDREDS of hens without a rooster. Unless you want chicks from them, or fertilized eggs for some other reason, you don't need a rooster at all for an egg-laying business.
     
  3. vstoltzfus

    vstoltzfus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 10, 2009
    Lancaster County, PA
    As the previous poster said, you don't need a rooster at all to get eggs. A rooster will certainly change the dynamics of your flock. Was there a particular reason you want/thought you need a rooster?
     
  4. Camille13

    Camille13 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 1, 2009
    I thought I had heard that after about 10 hens you needed a rooster to establish the pecking order. Is this not true? I am definitely not worried about fertilized eggs, and my hens so far seem quite content without a rooster. I also don't want one due to the noise. This would simplify my chicken life drastically! THanks!
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2010
  5. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    Ahh, you got the idea slightly wrong. IF you want to get fertilized eggs, you need a rooster for around every 10 hens.

    Pecking order will be established within your flock of hens just fine without a rooster.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2010
  6. acid_chipmunk

    acid_chipmunk Polish Silkies d'Uccles O my!

    Mar 29, 2010
    They will establish a pecking order with or without a rooster. They start doing this as chicks.

    And, I understand what you mean about the rooster. I couldn't take mine anymore and he went to freezer camp!
     
  7. Me & My Peeps

    Me & My Peeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 26, 2010
    Western MA
    Quote:Translated that means; " Left on their own, females will work it out by arguing amongst themselves [​IMG]"
     
  8. TM Chickens

    TM Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 3, 2008
    Alabama
    Me & My Peeps :

    Quote:Translated that means; " Left on their own, females will work it out by arguing amongst themselves [​IMG]"

    [​IMG]
     
  9. calicokat

    calicokat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 2, 2009
    azalia, indiana
    Just to clarify - 10 to 14 hens isn't a large flock yet . . . . . . . . . you need to get busy getting more chickens [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  10. Camille13

    Camille13 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 1, 2009
    Thanks everyone for the good and humorous advice! I know, relativity speaking 15 chickens isn't that many, but I live on a 10th of an acre lot in a densely packed mountain community. I am not even sure if I am allowed to have chickens! But lots of people do, and no one would ever complain, and we are on the end of town. So, I think I am going to try integrating all of them into one flock. Thanks!
     

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