How many male pheasants per female

marvun22

Songster
7 Years
Jul 8, 2012
680
19
124
North Dakota
I'm thinking about getting 15 pheasants and I'm wondering how many males per female I should get. I could order 20 and release excess males into the wild for hunting.
 

chooks4life

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 8, 2013
4,902
687
296
Australia
It depends on the type of pheasant. Some are monogamous, others run in trios. Not that I'm any kind of pheasant expert.

However I do know that if you take birds from a cage bred environment and just release them into the wild, many if not all would fail to survive. They need to have been raised in a fairly natural environment for that, to have the instinct and ability to cope. Some pheasants have been domesticated for countless generations and would probably do about as well as any cage bird if just released into the wild without prior training and 'rehabilitation'.

Being afraid of humans is no indication that they have the rest of their wild instincts intact. If they haven't been able to act on these instincts over even a good handful of recent ancestral generations, then there's every chance those instincts are flawed at best, lost at worst. If they're not native to your locale there's another risk, that of them eating toxic plants and insects for lack of knowledge of safe feeds.

Best wishes.
 

marvun22

Songster
7 Years
Jul 8, 2012
680
19
124
North Dakota
It depends on the type of pheasant. Some are monogamous, others run in trios. Not that I'm any kind of pheasant expert.

However I do know that if you take birds from a cage bred environment and just release them into the wild, many if not all would fail to survive. They need to have been raised in a fairly natural environment for that, to have the instinct and ability to cope. Some pheasants have been domesticated for countless generations and would probably do about as well as any cage bird if just released into the wild without prior training and 'rehabilitation'.

Being afraid of humans is no indication that they have the rest of their wild instincts intact. If they haven't been able to act on these instincts over even a good handful of recent ancestral generations, then there's every chance those instincts are flawed at best, lost at worst. If they're not native to your locale there's another risk, that of them eating toxic plants and insects for lack of knowledge of safe feeds.

Best wishes.

Ok, I will probably then just try straight run and hopefully end up at 8/7 female/male or better. If I end up with more males, I'll just make them a separate pen. That would be assuming I get 15, which is my goal.
 
Last edited:

marvun22

Songster
7 Years
Jul 8, 2012
680
19
124
North Dakota
Thank you for all the advice, while I might not get them for a while (6-10 years), I'll remember your advice and I'll post pictures of them when I get them.
 

ksp1

In the Brooder
6 Years
Mar 10, 2013
48
0
22
When we breed ringnecks at the farm we keep 1rooster per 8-10 hens and have great fertility.
 

chooks4life

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 8, 2013
4,902
687
296
Australia
Quote: Thanks, I look forward to it. At some time in future I too want to keep pheasants, so I'll be learning all I can about them too. Best wishes.
 

EriRojas

In the Brooder
6 Years
Sep 11, 2013
72
1
43
California
We keep 2.5 females per male. I know you can't have 2 females and a half but when you have a lot you're suppose to do the math. 1 male per 8-10 hens is too Many females. We raise hundreds yearly
 

ksp1

In the Brooder
6 Years
Mar 10, 2013
48
0
22
Don't your hens get beat up with that ratio? That's why we keep 8-10 per roo but we do keep back around 1000 hens and fertility is great and the hens keep there feathers and the roosters don't fight much
 

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