How many times a year will a hen go broody?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Krispyrice1230, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. Krispyrice1230

    Krispyrice1230 New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Jun 13, 2011
    I would like to maintain a sustainable flock with some birds for meat, so I was wondering how often that would happen.


    Thanks
     
  2. Sjisty

    Sjisty Scribe of Brahmalot

    4,247
    256
    291
    May 18, 2009
    Brooksville
    It really depends on the hen. I have some that have never been broody, but I have two (a bantam unknown breed and a serama) that if they even see an egg they're on it! My banty is broody probably 5 times a year. My little serama just finished with her chicks about a month ago and two weeks later decided a couple of Brahma eggs looked good, so she's been on them ever since.
     
  3. tofumama

    tofumama Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have cochin's that have never gone broody, some that go broody once a year, and my EE/silkie crosses have NEVER been broody, ever, and a silkie who is broody every other month it feels like! I let her have some eggs and raise chicks once a spring but she is a crazy one and just wants to be a mama ALL the time! I think it depends on the breed, but also the chickens.
     
  4. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

    7,950
    274
    331
    Aug 20, 2010
    Colmesneil,TX
    One of my Buff Orp hens raised a couple chicks earlier this year and now she's sitting on a golf ball. LOL! I'm getting her a few eggs though. And I have another that is sitting on basically nothing. For the second time this year. I just hope my last layer doesn't go broody too. At least not until my other pullets start to lay.

    So I don't know for sure, but I'd say it depends on the breed for sure. Orpingtons are known to be fairly broody and mine are true to form. Silkies are considered the best broody hens, I've heard that not being broody is almost unusual for a few of them. When you get into layer crosses like the sex links, they rarely get broody. Nor do leghorns.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by