How much Fodder to Feed

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by 2rocknp, Sep 8, 2013.

  1. 2rocknp

    2rocknp New Egg

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    Sep 8, 2013
    I have read through many of the fodder threads and it seams that most of the discussion turns to how to grow or what to grow.

    So for all you fodder feeders I am wondering how much fodder does a chicken eat and does it actually reduce their intake of layer while maintaining egg production? If so what do you recommend as a ratio?
     
  2. prov31mom23

    prov31mom23 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am very interested in knowing this, too and am surprised that nobody has responded. I have 45 layers - 9 bantams and the rest golden comets, barred rocks, partridge rocks, black australorps and easter eggers. How much fodder would I need to feed my girls each day if I intended this to be their primary source of food - particularly in the winter? How long does it take to grow a tray of fodder before it is ready to use? How much growing space would it take to feed a flock my size?
     
  3. Indigosands

    Indigosands Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd like to know as well, and how it integrates to other forms of feed used. I have also started using fermented feed with great success (2wks now) but I'm struggling with how much of each to offer and when. I'm thinking of doing a twice a day feeding like I've been doing with the fermented feed, and breaking up fodder to throw on top.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2013
  4. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    What are you referring to when you say fodder?
     
  5. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Last edited: Oct 24, 2013
  6. Indigosands

    Indigosands Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My own reference was to indoor grown barley fodder, yes. While there is a bit of a rush at hydroponically growing flats of fodder I would hardly call green fodder feeding a "fad". It's been done for ages where there is no means to get the livestock TO green pasture. You must bring it to them. I live in the desert where it's too hot for much more than a tomato to grow all summer long so this is my answer to not having pasture. I simply can't grow it or I would. So perhaps a better question is, how much of a chicken's diet consists of green pasture and how much of grain?
     
  7. nab58

    nab58 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From what I've read somewhere else on this forum....you can feed as much fodde raw you have and the chickens will stop eating it when they've had enough. You can't over feed. Same thing with the fermented feed. I've been leaving my ferment bucket in the run with the chickens all day and dole out a bowl for them. They eat the bowl and from the bucket (uncovered) but stop when they're full.
     
  8. SaveOurSkills

    SaveOurSkills New Egg

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    I would like to know if you have completely stopped offering them dry feed and if you feed fodder only?

    If you feed your chickens fodder only how much of a variety of seeds to you sprout?

    Thanks
     
  9. SaveOurSkills

    SaveOurSkills New Egg

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    Bueller?
    Bueller?
    Anyone?

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Banriona

    Banriona Chillin' With My Peeps

    I only feed my girls fodder in the winter once the green foliage has died or hibernated. I only use it as a supplement to their pelleted feed though. I'd hardly call myself an experienced chicken keeper though since we've not quite had them for a whole year yet.

    Thus far we've only had success sprouting BOSS and barley. Hoping we can add a few more successes to that by this winter as well as have some mealworms breeding.

    Hope that helps!
     

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