how old

ChickenCanoe

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7 days.
They can be 10 or even much longer depending on storage.
If they cool down to 70 or less shortly after being laid and stay about 60 and relatively high humidity for the storage period that's good.
Ideally they should go through only 2 temperature changes, when laid and when set.
They should be turned a couple times a day during storage. If they're going to be stored over 10 days they should be stored large end down.
There are other tricks to longer storage like pre-storage incubation and gas storage.
 

Orca5094

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Yep, 7-10 days is best, any longer than that and hatchability goes down. I personally like to go with no more than 7 days if at all possible.

Also, eggs should always be stored small end down, which is what I think ChickenCanoe meant to say? The air cell end (fat end) should always be up.
 

ChickenCanoe

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Yep, 7-10 days is best, any longer than that and hatchability goes down. I personally like to go with no more than 7 days if at all possible.

Also, eggs should always be stored small end down, which is what I think ChickenCanoe meant to say? The air cell end (fat end) should always be up.
You're right that normally eggs are stored small end down. But as I said, if storage is going to be long term, they should be small end up. During incubation small end is down but in extended storage small end should be up.
http://www.fass.org/fasscience/viewarticle.asp?article_id=373

I'll find some other research.
 
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Orca5094

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ChickenCanoe

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I was reading World Poultry on hatching egg storage and it had this quote.

"Turning eggs
A simple approach to preserve hatchability is to turn the eggs during storage, like it is done during incubation. If there is no automatic equipment installed, turning by hand three times each day is sufficient. If the eggs are kept on cardboard trays instead of setter trays, they can be stored upside down – with the pointed end up. This keeps the yolk and the embryo in a central position and protects the latter during storage. Eggs should preferably not be transported this way, because it might cause loose air cells. Of course they should be set in the incubator with the pointed end down. Turning the eggs back up just before pre-warming/setting is early enough."

http://www.worldpoultry.net/Home/Ge...tored-eggs-1421405W/?dossier=34595&widgetid=1

I did this with the eggs that are getting ready to hatch. I had a carton of 18 and one of 12 that I was holding longer and I just gently turned the cartons upside down.
 

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