how to convince my mom to let me breed our barred holland? is it even worth it?

FluffyFaverolles

Chirping
Nov 28, 2020
62
133
63
hi there. i apologize if this is the wrong area.
i have a barred holland. i want to breed her, but i’m not sure how i’d convince my mom. we don’t have any Roos, used to but not anymore (plus, definitely not a barred holland roo.)
i know they’re a rare breed and i want to keep them in circulation, so i figured one more breeding definitely wouldn’t hurt the population.
but... she’s also blind. no idea how that affects breeding. i also don’t know if there’s anyone around who has a roo she can breed with.
I guess this is more of a vent than anything because I feel guilty that I have a critically endangered breed that I’m not doing anything with. because im not sure how id even convince my mom to let that happen
but if you guys have any ideas, that’d be cool
 

JacinLarkwell

Crowing
Mar 19, 2020
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South-Eastern Montana
Wad she born blind or blind from an injury? They're actually not as rare as some people think they are. What are plans for extra males hatched? Even rare males don't always have a set use.
 

FluffyFaverolles

Chirping
Nov 28, 2020
62
133
63
Wad she born blind or blind from an injury? They're actually not as rare as some people think they are. What are plans for extra males hatched? Even rare males don't always have a set use.
blind from an injury/illness. we got her as a chick and one day we noticed she was acting weird and it turned out she became blind.. somehow. i’m not sure about males. my mom doesn’t let us keep roos (we live in a somewhat urban setting, our last roo was stolen, suspect our neighbors did it :( )
are they really not that rare? the livestock conservancy lists them as critically endangered
 

nuthatched

It's Soup Season!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 9, 2019
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Do you have 4h?
The thing is, you could just get a barred Holland roo, but small breeding groups are a little easier on the hens, so you'd have to get a few more hens too. If you plan on selling hatching eggs, you need more hens to get a decent amount of eggs per day to sell so they will not be too old by the time there's a decent clutch. There's a lot of details that could be a lot more work and an investment than most people want to get in to. Strenuous research is the key to pleading your case if you want to go through with it, find all the info you can on the breed, breeding ratios, marketing, etc.
Do you know if the blindness is genetic?
 

JacinLarkwell

Crowing
Mar 19, 2020
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South-Eastern Montana
blind from an injury/illness. we got her as a chick and one day we noticed she was acting weird and it turned out she became blind.. somehow. i’m not sure about males. my mom doesn’t let us keep roos (we live in a somewhat urban setting, our last roo was stolen, suspect our neighbors did it :( )
are they really not that rare? the livestock conservancy lists them as critically endangered
There are quite a few birds still listed but they're certainly not about to drop off the earth. I wouldn't breed her if she's blind, there's a chance she has a genetic reason since it happened so young. Plus if you're not sure if you can keep a male (no reason someone would steal a rooster except to turn him in if they were complaining). And you still need to plan what to do with males if you can't give them away
 

FluffyFaverolles

Chirping
Nov 28, 2020
62
133
63
There are quite a few birds still listed but they're certainly not about to drop off the earth. I wouldn't breed her if she's blind, there's a chance she has a genetic reason since it happened so young. Plus if you're not sure if you can keep a male (no reason someone would steal a rooster except to turn him in if they were complaining). And you still need to plan what to do with males if you can't give them away
that makes me feel less guilty about it, then. yeah, i’m not actually sure why he disappeared still. our neighbors never complained to us directly or on nextdoor or anything, one day he was just gone. we would have gotten rid of him ourself if they did complain to us! i know for a fact that would’ve been the last straw for my mom.

well, thank you for helping me a bit. :] i appreciate it
 

JacinLarkwell

Crowing
Mar 19, 2020
6,723
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South-Eastern Montana
I'm not sure how they determine the rarity, it's not like you have to register every one that exists like racehorses, I'm sure there's more than they think.
I thought my brahma was rare, turns out, they're not.
And if you look, things like Sumatra and Yokohama are still called rare, if not even less common in catalogues for hatcheries. I can assure they're pretty common
 

FluffyFaverolles

Chirping
Nov 28, 2020
62
133
63
Do you have 4h?
The thing is, you could just get a barred Holland roo, but small breeding groups are a little easier on the hens, so you'd have to get a few more hens too. If you plan on selling hatching eggs, you need more hens to get a decent amount of eggs per day to sell so they will not be too old by the time there's a decent clutch. There's a lot of details that could be a lot more work and an investment than most people want to get in to. Strenuous research is the key to pleading your case if you want to go through with it, find all the info you can on the breed, breeding ratios, marketing, etc.
Do you know if the blindness is genetic?
the blindness must be genetic, i don’t think any of our other hens caused it as they don’t go for the face when pecking.
thank you for responding though, i don’t have 4h or anything, though i would like to join a local organization for it.
thank you for responding. i suppose that this post is definitely wishful thinking, then, for now. the other user said they weren’t as rare as often listed, which made me feel less guilty
cheers
 

BigBlueHen53

We will get through this... together!
Premium Feather Member
Mar 5, 2019
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Before you try to persuade your mother this is a good idea, consider the logistics of what you are wanting to do. How would you arrange a breeding if you can't have a male? Do you know somebody who has a male of the same breed? Would you transport her to the rooster? How well would she integrate into the rooster's flock and how long would that take? (A couple of weeks usually.) How about quarantining her for 30 days before that? Responsible flock owners usually do that before integrating new chickens into their flocks. So that's 6 weeks your blind chicken would be segregated in a strange place before she could be put in with her breeding partner. Has she ever been bred before? Might that be a shock to her system? Do you really want to put this blind bird through all this trauma in hopes of getting a few fertile eggs out of her? Once you do get some fertile eggs, what then? If she does not go broody, you will have to come up with some way of hatching those eggs. And if they hatch, 21 days later, you will need to brood them for several weeks until they are old enough to survive in a coop on their own. They will need food, water, grit, etc. That's a lot to think about. You need to convinve your mother you're up for all this. How are your grades. Do you keep your room clean? Do all your chores without being told? Have a cooperative attitude? Those things go a long way toward convincing parents that kids can handle big responsibilities. Good luck!
 

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