how to keep HUMIDITY LOW at Janoel 12

Ragazzoragno

In the Brooder
Nov 18, 2018
5
2
11
Hi, i got a janoel 12, i already fix the temperature CA (was 1.6 C° off), now if i pour 100 ml of water every 2 days it will always be at 75% humidity, so i started trying just adding 20 ml of water and after 21 hours it goes from 72% (when i poured it) to 38% (after 21 hours at 32C° outside). but at 38% humidity it was DRY at the base, so my question is, could it be completly dry until the hygrometer don't go below 30% or it always has to have water on it? because i think the only way to keep the humidity through 30-50% is just adding 20-30 ml every 2 days and sometimes at 30% i will be DRY. anyone with the same issue?
 

R2elk

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Hi, i got a janoel 12, i already fix the temperature CA (was 1.6 C° off), now if i pour 100 ml of water every 2 days it will always be at 75% humidity, so i started trying just adding 20 ml of water and after 21 hours it goes from 72% (when i poured it) to 38% (after 21 hours at 32C° outside). but at 38% humidity it was DRY at the base, so my question is, could it be completely dry until the hygrometer don't go below 30% or it always has to have water on it? because i think the only way to keep the humidity through 30-50% is just adding 20-30 ml every 2 days and sometimes at 30% i will be DRY. anyone with the same issue?
First make sure you check the humidity with a calibrated hygrometer.

Your ambient humidity has a lot to do with what the humidity in your incubator will be. Because the temperature in the incubator is higher, the humidity in the incubator will naturally be lower than your ambient humidity. If your ambient humidity is like mine (10% or lower in the winter), your incubator will require added water to achieve an acceptable humidity in the incubator. If your ambient humidity is 60% or higher, you probably will not need to add any water during the incubation phase until the lockdown stage.

If you add water to the incubator, the humidity is directly proportional to the surface area of the water and not the amount of water you add. If you need to add water and still need a lower humidity, put the water in a container that has a smaller opening rather than letting it spread out in the water channel of the incubator.
 

Ragazzoragno

In the Brooder
Nov 18, 2018
5
2
11
First make sure you check the humidity with a calibrated hygrometer.

Your ambient humidity has a lot to do with what the humidity in your incubator will be. Because the temperature in the incubator is higher, the humidity in the incubator will naturally be lower than your ambient humidity. If your ambient humidity is like mine (10% or lower in the winter), your incubator will require added water to achieve an acceptable humidity in the incubator. If your ambient humidity is 60% or higher, you probably will not need to add any water during the incubation phase until the lockdown stage.

If you add water to the incubator, the humidity is directly proportional to the surface area of the water and not the amount of water you add. If you need to add water and still need a lower humidity, put the water in a container that has a smaller opening rather than letting it spread out in the water channel of the incubator.

Thank you so much!!! have never heard about that relation humidity/surface. i'll try it btw the humidity in the room is always near 60%.
 

JaeG

Crossing the Road
6 Years
Sep 29, 2014
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New Zealand
I have to use a little cup of water in my incubator initially or the humidity is too high. Filling either water well is just too much. You'll have to monitor your air cells as for some people 30% is what they incubate at (you shouldn't go any lower than 25% apparently), and for others that would be much too low. So it's all about figuring out what works in your incubator's little micro climate and the size of the air cells will tell you if your eggs need more or less humidity (you'll find 'air cell charts' on Google images to compare to). It's the overall average humidity that counts so the odd spike one way or another isn't going to affect your eggs. Good luck!
 

R2elk

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Feb 24, 2013
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without any water, the humidity was at 38% isn't it to low??? day number 8 of incubation.
As @JaeG pointed out there really isn't a set number that you can guaranteed go by. The development of the air cells is more important than what the hygrometer reads. I aim for 30% to 35% humidity in my forced air cabinet incubator during the incubation period. It works for me.

I would not be concerned about having 38% humidity in my incubator. Thirty-eight percent humidity is pretty close to what you should be getting without adding water if your room humidity is 60%.

Some people don't pay any attention at all to what the hygrometer says and adjust the amount of water in their incubators based solely on the weight loss achieved with the eggs.

Read Hatching Eggs 101 by @Sally Sunshine
 

Ragazzoragno

In the Brooder
Nov 18, 2018
5
2
11
I have to use a little cup of water in my incubator initially or the humidity is too high. Filling either water well is just too much. You'll have to monitor your air cells as for some people 30% is what they incubate at (you shouldn't go any lower than 25% apparently), and for others that would be much too low. So it's all about figuring out what works in your incubator's little micro climate and the size of the air cells will tell you if your eggs need more or less humidity (you'll find 'air cell charts' on Google images to compare to). It's the overall average humidity that counts so the odd spike one way or another isn't going to affect your eggs. Good luck!
What about this air cell?? It is it 8th day of incubation.
 

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